A new play about climate change opened Thursday in New York that’s part-thriller, part-musical, part-educational and all-controversial.

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has a 5 percentage point lead in Colorado over Democrat Hillary Clinton in a possible 2016 presidential matchup, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll.

Responding to a unity accord among Palestinian factions, the Israeli government said Thursday that it was suspending negotiations with the Palestinians, breaking off nine months of talks brokered by Secretary of State John Kerry.

A federal judge has rejected Lockheed Martin Corp.’s bid to make the federal government pay for the past clean-ups at three tainted production sites.

The State Department gives a breakdown of the $1.5 billion U.S. aid package reserved for Egypt this year as bilateral relations improve.

The Federal Communications Commission plans to propose new rules today that would let Internet service providers charge companies to move their content through a speedier lane, a “pay for play” model that opponents say will kill net neutrality.

President Barack Obama spent his first full day of a weeklong Asia trip aimed at renewing U.S. ties to the region with the red-carpeted pomp of a state dinner, a visit to a shrine _ where he left a prayer card _ and the “full trust” of Japan’s prime minister that the U.S. will back it in a tiff over disputed land with China.

Colorado's U.S. Senate race is "too close to call," according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday.

The Chicago Tribune on Thursday published a lengthy story on the U.S. Army's investigation into the death last year of State Department press officer Anne Smedinghoff that contradicts much of what the State Department said at the time. In particular, it confirms this account by McClatchy's Jay Price that the group Smedinghoff was part of was lost when a bomb exploded in the Afghan city of Qalat on April 6, 2013.

Turkish troops conducting a resupply mission to a small Turkish military post inside Syrian territory were ambushed and detained Wednesday by Islamic extremists affiliated with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, according to Turkish media reports.

Myles Malman may not have been a marathon man, but he sure lived like one.

In response to a deadly train derailment last summer, the Canadian government Wednesday ordered the country’s railroads to phase out tens of thousands of older, puncture-prone tank cars from crude oil transportation within three years.

After 15 days of no food deliveries in Yarmouk, the U.N.'s Relief and Works Agency is ready to restart Thursday.

In a dramatic move aimed at restoring equal justice, the administration announced on April 23rd an initiative under which President Barack Obama could grant clemency to hundreds, even thousands of drug abusers and other nonviolent federal prisoners who’ve served 10 years or more.

If CTS Corp. and its Obama administration allies win, as they well might, a number of North Carolina-related environmental lawsuits and health claims will fail.

The State Department said it was disappointed in the surprise rapprochement between the Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas.

Both sides predict that the case will be the first in a long line of lawsuits to hit states over teacher-protection rights, opening a new front in the attack on laws that govern tenure, seniority and dismissal.

President Barack Obama kicked off a tour of Asia on Wednesday with a pointed message to China and the entire region: The U.S. stands resolutely with Japan in a long dispute over some small islands in the East China Sea.

Syrian regime tanks and artillery shelled rebel positions Thursday in the central old city district of Homs, according to rebels and anti-government activists, who said they believe that the last rebel bastion will be overwhelmed by government forces in the coming days.

He captured the photograph that immortalized the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989: a lone man in a white shirt standing before a row of tanks, seemingly fearless after the Chinese military has unleashed a bloody assault on pro-democracy protesters.

Declaring that diplomatic efforts to alleviate suffering in Syria’s civil war have failed, the heads of five United Nations agencies issued a new warning Wednesday over the plight of millions of civilians trapped by fighting between the Assad regime and rebel forces.

Republican Curt Clawson, who won a GOP primary for a vacant Florida congressional seat Tuesday, immediately said he wants to duel with President Barack Obama on the basketball court.

By Lesley Clark McClatchy Washington Bureau

Obama, who is making the first state visit to Japan by a U.S. president since former president Bill Clinton, arrived at Haneda International Airport shortly before 7 p.m. local time and was to have a private dinner with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., is in recovery after heart surgery, his office said Tuesday. The 63-year-old senator was taken to the hospital overnight after suffering chest and arm pain.

President Barack Obama told a Japanese newspaper on the eve of his arrival here that the U.S. considers the small islands in the East China Sea subject to a bitter Chinese-Japanese dispute within the scope of a U.S.-Japan security treaty.

Supreme Court justices seemed torn Tuesday as they listened to the arguments in a complex technological case involving copyright law, the rights of TV broadcasters and a video startup called Aereo that is upending how viewers access television.

Six hundred U.S. troops are headed for Poland and the three Baltic countries for live-ammunition infantry exercises with armed forces from the four former Soviet-bloc nations.

None of the tank cars currently in service carrying Bakken crude oil is adequate for carrying that product, a rail industry representative testified Tuesday, but until new federal regulations are completed, the use of inadequate cars will continue.

The Supreme Court on Tuesday accorded voters more leeway to challenge affirmative action, as justices upheld a Michigan measure that bans preferential treatment in college admissions based on race or ethnicity.

The heavy anti-tank missiles recently shown in videos being fired by Western-backed Syrian rebels were manufactured in the United States, and their transfer to the rebels would have required direct American government approval, according to experts in international weapons deals.

The Cowboy and Indian Alliance met Tuesday morning in front of the Capital to kick off a five-day protest against the proposed expansion of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

International monitors say Syria has disposed of more than 80 percent of it chemical arsenal, but new attack claims have emerged.

Top Justice Department officials are fanning out across college campuses to fight violence against women.

Anonymous tipsters have more credibility under a closely divided Supreme Court decision Tuesday that upheld the tip-incited search of a California man’s truck.

The nation’s spy satellite agency failed to notify authorities when some employees and contractors confessed during lie detector tests to crimes such as child molestation, an intelligence inspector general has concluded.

Affirmative action again split the Supreme Court on Tuesday, as sharply divided justices upheld a Michigan measure that bans preferential treatment in college admissions based on race or ethnicity.

Employees of U.S. intelligence agencies have been barred from discussing any intelligence-related matter _even if it isn’t classified _ with journalists without authorization, according to a new directive by Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

A closely divided Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the search of a California man’s drug-laden car following an anonymous tip.

The Obama administration must make public central portions of a Justice Department opinion that held that the government has the legal authority to launch drone strikes overseas against Americans it determines are plotting terrorist attacks on U.S. targets, a federal appeals court ruled on Monday.

Federal securities investigators say that the man that BP initially put in charge of cleaning up the oil from its massive 2010 Macondo well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico used nonpublic information to safely dump $1 million of his family’s company stock before the share price nosedived.

Dual marketing disputes have ripened for the California-based makers of Pom Wonderful pomegranate juice, with Supreme Court justices sounding sympathetic Monday to some company claims.

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Tuesday released a report about the problem of “automatic defaults” on private student loans.

The presidents of Mexico and Colombia Monday evening stood before an urn containing the ashes of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and extolled him as the most transcendent Spanish-language writer in centuries.

A series of U.S. government drone strikes in Yemen over recent days has brought into sharp relief divisions among the country’s rulers over how to rein in a program that they’ve long supported.

Frank Roche, an economics instructor and commentator, says he’s been working to get into politics for five solid years, and now sees the debate over immigration as his chance to win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Employees of U.S. intelligence agencies have been barred from discussing any intelligence-related matter _even if it isn’t classified _ with journalists without authorization, according to a new directive by Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

The release over the weekend of four French journalists whom a rogue al Qaida offshoot had held for months in Syria may indicate that the group is turning increasingly to ransom to finance its activities.

Under pressure to act on the issue of sexual assault in the military, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel visited a rape crisis organization Monday to stress the Pentagon’s commitment to ensuring that victims of sexual violence are taken seriously in the armed forces.

Thousands of kids swarmed the White House Monday for the 136th running of the White House Easter Egg Roll, shoulder-to-shoulder with celebrities from Jim Carrey to Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III. At stake were precious commemorative eggs bearing the signatures of the president and first lady or paw prints of White House dogs Sunny and Bo.

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