Roseville/Placer News

Anti-Trump protest draws small crowd near Roseville Galleria

Anti-Trump protesters gather at Roseville Parkway and Galleria Boulevard in Roseville on Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016.
Anti-Trump protesters gather at Roseville Parkway and Galleria Boulevard in Roseville on Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016. egarrison@sacbee.com

After weeks of fervent protests across the country in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential election, a small group of protesters in Roseville on Sunday tried with minimal success to distract shoppers on their way to the Galleria.

As hundreds of cars streamed through the intersection of Roseville Parkway and Galleria Boulevard on their way to Thanksgiving weekend sales, about 10 people waved signs reading “Trump: the face of racism” and “Fight white supremacy.”

Republicans outnumber Democrats in Placer County nearly 2-1, according to the Placer County Elections Office.

“Honestly, I didn’t plan on having a large turnout,” organizer Jamier Sale said. “It’s about the people driving by, honking. And it’s about people seeing that there’s people who don’t support Trump in Roseville.”

Sale, 25, said he grew up in Roseville and grew accustomed to racism in school. As one of just a few students of color, he felt marginalized in the city. He said gathering at the corner near the Galleria, where all the shoppers would see the protest, was intended to show anyone feeling ostracized in Roseville that there are like-minded people out there.

Yeimi Lopez said there were more people honking and giving thumbs up than people yelling hateful things out the window. She and Sale are part of the ANSWER Coalition, a national organization working to stop war and end racism.

Lopez said she first got involved in movements for the rights of undocumented immigrant workers and students. While working with those efforts she realized the power of coalition-building with the Black Lives Matter group, environmental justice activists and LGBTQ rights advocates.

She said she thinks Trump’s election has contributed to a strengthening of bonds between groups seeking different types of social justice “because we have a clear enemy. … More than coming together over a political ideology, which is real, it’s also coming together for safety.”

Ellen Garrison: 916-321-1920, @EllenGarrison

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