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Heading to ArtStreet this weekend? Here are five things to know (including where to park)

Sacramento 'ArtStreet' temporary exhibit opens

A Sacramento artists group opens a temporary 'Art Street' exhibit on Friday, Feb. 3. Exhibits include a wide variety of art forms from local and international artists. The group M5 Arts was also behind the wildly popular 2016 Art Hotel, in which a
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A Sacramento artists group opens a temporary 'Art Street' exhibit on Friday, Feb. 3. Exhibits include a wide variety of art forms from local and international artists. The group M5 Arts was also behind the wildly popular 2016 Art Hotel, in which a

An abandoned factory just south of Broadway has transformed into a must-go destination for Sacramento arts. Well, at least that’s the case until Feb. 27. ArtStreet opens to the public at 3 p.m. Friday (Feb. 3) showcasing more than 100 artists from Sacramento and beyond in a temporary space. The makeshift museum is expected to draw thousands during its three week run, which will features murals, installations, music and much more.

So, what can you expect from ArtStreet and how can you plan ahead? Here are five things to know about the unusual event, which runs from 3-9 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekends (and sometimes later).

1. ArtStreet is from the same folks behind the Art Hotel

The overwhelming turnout nearly caught Sacramento’s art community off guard, with some 15,000 patrons, often braving long lines, visiting 2016’s Art Hotel during its two week run.

The project from M5 Arts transformed a dilapidated downtown apartment building into a hub of Sacramento culture, with more than 60 artists turning a once depressing space into a vibrant, albeit temporary museum-like space for visual artists, poets and musicians.

M5 Arts returns with the more expansive ArtStreet, which utilizes more than 65,000 square feet of interior and exterior space at 300 First Ave. This project plays with an overall theme of “street,” with artists exploring avenues and concepts related to connectivity, transportation and community.

2. ArtStreet covers a wide swath of artists

The energizing forces behind ArtStreet including muralists, musicians, poets, performance artists and more.

The roster covers a few generations of creative types, including 13-year-old Jake Pluckebaum, who created a kind of self-portrait sculpture from spent spray paint cans. The advanced photography class at Sutter Middle School are also ArtStreet participants.

On the other end of the demographic spectrum, ArtStreet includes some of Sacramento’s veteran artists and thought leaders, including Shaun Burner, Gioia Fonda and Jose Di Gregorio.

3. ArtStreet is free (and so is parking)

That’s right, even the most starving of artists can afford to visit ArtStreet. There’s no charge for admission, though donations are certainly welcome to support this effort.

For those who want to help underwrite specific projects at ArtStreet, donations can also be made online toward the artist of your choosing.

But even with the free admission, it’s still a good idea to bring a few bucks. Food will be for sale from ArtStreet’s COKI (a.k.a. collaborative kitchen), and adult beverages can be purchased inside ArtStreet at “The West End,” which is themed after the watering holes and cabarets from a downtown neighborhood of Sacramento’s past.

Plan to park on the street along First Avenue or other nearby streets just south of Broadway. Ridesharing is encouraged.

4. You don’t have to wait in line – for a $10 donation

Getting into Art Hotel often required the art of patience. Long lines were the norm, and they likely will be at ArtStreet as well. But for a $10 donation, you can reserve a time slot for visiting ArtStreet and eschew the lines. Otherwise, the event is first come, first served.

5. Even if you’re stuck waiting in line, you probably won’t be bored

While the bulk of ArtStreet will be held inside the warehouse, the exterior space will be utilized as well for showcasing creative energy. Look for various outdoor art installations, or just strike up a conversation with your line neighbors.

One of the highlights of Art Hotel was bringing together a concentration of cultured types and supporters of the arts, which helped foster a sense of Sacramento’s coalescing arts community. Take the chance to mix, mingle and network, if need be.

Chris Macias: 916-321-1253, @chris_macias

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