FILE - In this July 28, 2018 file photo, cosplayer fans watch the competition between Philadelphia Fusion and London Spitfire during the Overwatch League Grand Finals competition, at Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Most professional esports are devoid of female players at their highest levels, even though 45 percent of U.S. gamers are women or girls. Executives for titles like League of Legends and Overwatch say they are eager to add women to pro rosters, but many female gamers say they’re discouraged from chasing such careers by toxic behavior and other barriers.
FILE - In this July 28, 2018 file photo, cosplayer fans watch the competition between Philadelphia Fusion and London Spitfire during the Overwatch League Grand Finals competition, at Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Most professional esports are devoid of female players at their highest levels, even though 45 percent of U.S. gamers are women or girls. Executives for titles like League of Legends and Overwatch say they are eager to add women to pro rosters, but many female gamers say they’re discouraged from chasing such careers by toxic behavior and other barriers. Mary Altaffer, File AP Photo
FILE - In this July 28, 2018 file photo, cosplayer fans watch the competition between Philadelphia Fusion and London Spitfire during the Overwatch League Grand Finals competition, at Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Most professional esports are devoid of female players at their highest levels, even though 45 percent of U.S. gamers are women or girls. Executives for titles like League of Legends and Overwatch say they are eager to add women to pro rosters, but many female gamers say they’re discouraged from chasing such careers by toxic behavior and other barriers. Mary Altaffer, File AP Photo