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New clue that Amelia Earhart may have landed plane safely, died as castaway

In this May 20, 1937 photo, provided by The Paragon Agency, shows aviator Amelia Earhart on the wing of her Electra plane, taken by Albert Bresnik at Burbank Airport in Burbank, Calif. It was a clear spring day in 1937 when Amelia Earhart, ready to make history by flying around the world, brought her personal photographer to a small Southern California airport to document the journey's beginning.
In this May 20, 1937 photo, provided by The Paragon Agency, shows aviator Amelia Earhart on the wing of her Electra plane, taken by Albert Bresnik at Burbank Airport in Burbank, Calif. It was a clear spring day in 1937 when Amelia Earhart, ready to make history by flying around the world, brought her personal photographer to a small Southern California airport to document the journey's beginning. AP

Scientists are claiming they have a vital clue that legendary aviator Amelia Earhart may have landed her plane safely on a remote island and died as a castaway there.

They say a new discovery shows a striking similarity between the pilot and the partial skeleton of a castaway found on an island of Kiribati in 1940.

Earhart was last heard from on July 2, 1937, as she tried to establish a record as the first woman to fly around the world.

According to the Earhart Project, “there is a newly discovered similarity between Amelia Earhart and the castaway whose partial skeleton was found on Nikumaroro in 1940,” The Daily Mail reported.

The Daily Mail report said the bones, suspected by their discoverer of being Earhart’s, were dismissed by British authorities after a doctor judged them to be male.

An anthropologist discovered that the skeleton’s forearms were larger than average, which is consistent with the statistics of women born in the late 19th century. Earhart was born in 1897.

“The (skeletal) match does not, of course, prove that the castaway was Amelia Earhart but it is a significant new data point that tips the scales further in that direction," The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery said in a press release.

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