Business & Real Estate

In these California places, women tend to earn more money than their husbands

Batgirl fights for equal pay for equal work

40 years ago, Batgirl fought for equal pay for equal work, a fight that persists today. While the wage gap has closed slightly, women still earn 78 percent of what men earn, on average. And for women of color the gap is even wider. (originally pu
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40 years ago, Batgirl fought for equal pay for equal work, a fight that persists today. While the wage gap has closed slightly, women still earn 78 percent of what men earn, on average. And for women of color the gap is even wider. (originally pu

Most California households have a gender pay gap.

Women make more than their husbands or partners just 31 percent of the time in California households headed by members of the opposite sex, according to a Bee review of the latest census data.

But the disparity fluctuates across the state.

Women in the Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles metro areas earn more than their husbands more often than women elsewhere in the state. Women in semi-rural locations like Hanford, Madera and Bakersfield make more than their husbands less frequently.

Urban areas like Sacramento, San Francisco and Los Angeles have a high number of jobs that require a college degree. Jobs that require a college degree often pay more than jobs that don’t. And women today are more likely to have a college degree than men.

The large majority of women holding jobs that don’t require a college degree make less than their husbands. The biggest disparities in pay are found in households where women work as teacher assistants, recreation and fitness workers, food preparation workers and childcare providers.

On the other hand, women who work as registered nurses, securities sales agents, veterinarians, lawyers and doctors usually make more than their male partners.

The most common job, by far, held by women who make more than their male partners is registered nurse. Registered nurses in about 62,000 California households make more than their male partners.

Finally, a stigma remains around the idea of wives making more than husbands. A new census bureau report finds that women who make more than their husbands tend to understate their income, while their husbands overstate their income, to make the gap seem smaller.



Phillip Reese is a Bee data specialist and teaches at Sacramento State: 916-321-1137.

40 years ago, Batgirl fought for equal pay for equal work, a fight that persists today. While the wage gap has closed slightly, women still earn 78 percent of what men earn, on average. And for women of color the gap is even wider. (originally pu

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