FILE- In this Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, file photo traders gather at the post of Anthony Matesic, center, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The past decade has seen an explosion in new exchange-traded funds. Investors have flocked to ETFs because they trade like individual stocks, but offer the diversification benefits of mutual funds, all at a low cost. But not all funds attract investors, and ETFs are dying off at a near-record rate this year.
FILE- In this Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, file photo traders gather at the post of Anthony Matesic, center, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The past decade has seen an explosion in new exchange-traded funds. Investors have flocked to ETFs because they trade like individual stocks, but offer the diversification benefits of mutual funds, all at a low cost. But not all funds attract investors, and ETFs are dying off at a near-record rate this year. Richard Drew, File AP Photo
FILE- In this Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, file photo traders gather at the post of Anthony Matesic, center, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The past decade has seen an explosion in new exchange-traded funds. Investors have flocked to ETFs because they trade like individual stocks, but offer the diversification benefits of mutual funds, all at a low cost. But not all funds attract investors, and ETFs are dying off at a near-record rate this year. Richard Drew, File AP Photo

What to do when a fund in your portfolio closes

November 08, 2018 07:14 AM