Business & Real Estate

Sacramento pop-up store plans to stick around

Display: California is a new pop-up store that recently opened in the Broadway Triangle complex in Oak Park. Every six to eight weeks, the store will change themes and sell new items. The items for sale are mostly locally crafted by small businesses and artists that do not have their own storefronts.
Display: California is a new pop-up store that recently opened in the Broadway Triangle complex in Oak Park. Every six to eight weeks, the store will change themes and sell new items. The items for sale are mostly locally crafted by small businesses and artists that do not have their own storefronts. apayne@sacbee.com

The problem with a pop-up store is that, eventually, it goes away.

Sacramento entrepreneurs Roshaun and Maritza Davis believe they have the answer for that – opening what amounts to a perpetual pop-up store.

Display: California, at 3433 Broadway in Sacramento’s Oak Park neighborhood, is showcasing the creations of 40 merchants and designers. Display opened on Black Friday last month, and the co-owners said they have seen a steady stream of foot traffic since then, even on stormy days like Thursday.

Merchandise in the bright, attractively laid-out shop runs the gamut: jewelry, housewares, footwear, clothing, crafts and toys, to name just a few.

The couple said about 90 percent of the merchandise is Sacramento-made.

“We try to focus on local,” Roshaun Davis said.

The current store is called Holladay, but that will change after Jan. 24, when the store space will be extensively reworked and redecorated to become a pop-up wedding chapel. The chapel will have a seating area and be available for weddings, as well as a venue to renew vows or host gatherings.

The Display concept aims to change out the pop-up store with a new theme and appearance every six to eight weeks. The changes also create more opportunities to showcase the creations of local designers, artists and business people. For each item sold, the store takes 40 percent and the artist keeps 60 percent.

The six- to eight-week turnover might seem like a killing pace, but the Davises have no problem with it. They’re co-founders of Unseen Heroes, a six-year-old event organizing and marketing agency that’s helped put on the popular Gather Oak Park event and the Good Street Food and Design Market in Del Paso Heights.

“We’re used to putting events together quickly, sometimes in one day,” Maritza Davis said. “For us, six or eight weeks seems like a long time.”

At 34th Street and Broadway, the Davises not only oversee Display, but they can talk to prospective clients in Unseen Heroes’ neighboring office. Both spots sparkle with fresh paint, overhead lighting and color-coordinated furnishings.

“We’ve had people come in and tell us this looks like something they’d see in San Francisco,” Roshaun Davis said.

Besides functioning as a continually changing pop-up store, Display also acts as a sort of miniature small-business incubator, according to the co-owners.

“If you’ve been thinking about going into business on your own, this is a good place to test it out ... to see how things might work for you,” he said.

Maritza Davis also believes Display is a plus for Oak Park, “in an area that’s nice, with walkability, with restaurants, shops and everything close by.” She said many of the designers selling items in Display live within a few blocks of the establishment.

Display: California is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, visit displaycalifornia.com or call (916) 822-4925.

Call The Bee’s Mark Glover, (916) 321-1184.

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