Personal Finance

Sacramento’s income gap jumps into America’s top 10 in new study

A Bloomberg analysis provided cloudy economic news for Sacramento: The city’s richest 20 percent and poorest 20 percent rose by $46,500 between 2011 and 2016.
A Bloomberg analysis provided cloudy economic news for Sacramento: The city’s richest 20 percent and poorest 20 percent rose by $46,500 between 2011 and 2016. Sacramento Bee file photo

The economic disparity between Sacramento’s richest and poorest residents is grew more drastically from 2011 to 2016 than all but five cities in America, according to a Bloomberg analysis.

The gap between Sacramento’s richest 20 percent and poorest 20 percent rose by $46,500 over the five-year span, behind only San Jose, San Francisco, Seattle, Bridgeport, Conn., and Charleston, S.C., among the U.S.’s 100 largest cities. Sacramento’s increase in disparity was 32nd in the nation from 2010-15.

Sacramento also had the sixth-highest increase between average super-rich (top 5 percent) and middle class (middle 20 percent) households incomes, boosting the difference up from $222,100 to $325,100. The city’s $103,000 increase was nearly twice the American average during that time.

San Jose, Bridgeport and Charleston had higher gaps between their super-rich and middle class than Sacramento, as did Baton Rouge and Boise.

People from pricey cities on the California coast have flocked to Sacramento in recent years, often bringing higher-than-average salaries with them.

Benjy Egel: (916) 321-0152, @BenjyEgel

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