Fires

What the Camp Fire, other California wildfires look like from space

Now the most damaging wildfire in California’s history, the Camp Fire continues to rage after starting Thursday morning in Butte County.

As of Saturday, Cal Fire reported that the Camp Fire had reached 100,000 acres 20 percent containment.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said in a tweet that hot spots and smoke plumes from the fire could be seen from space.

An estimated 6,600 commercial and residential structures have been reportedly destroyed.

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Satellite footage shows smoke and hot spots from the Camp Fire on Friday. Strong winds pushed smoke over the Sacramento Valley, causing air quality to diminish. Joshua Stevens - NASA Earth Observatory

More than 15,000 structures in Butte County remain threatened by the blaze, which continues to grow under “extreme fire and weather conditions,” according to the latest incident report.

Smoke from the fire hit the Sacramento region Friday, causing the The Air Quality Index for Sacramento to fall into the very unhealthy category at 3 p.m. on Saturday, which means there are significant pollutants in the air, according to the Spare The Air website. Everyone should avoid prolonged heavy outdoor exertion.

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Satellite footage shows smoke and hot spots from the Camp Fire on Friday. Strong winds pushed smoke over the Sacramento Valley, causing air quality to diminish. Joshua Stevens NASA Earth Observatory

Smoke has blanketed much of California from both the Camp Fire, which has produced smoky skies in Sacramento and the Bay Area, as well as the Woolsey and Hill fires, which are burning in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties, affecting air quality in Los Angeles and other parts of Southern California.

The air is expected to be just as bad Sunday when moderate and gusty northerly winds are expected to continue. Depending on wind and the Camp Fire’s status, smoke could be visible in the capital area through early next week, according to Spare the Air.

More than 3,200 fire personnel were fighting the blaze as of Saturday morning, including 67 hand crews and 67 bulldozers digging lines to try to stop its spread.

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