Water & Drought

Drinking-water crisis ends in Mount Shasta

Drone captures beauty of Shasta Lake and Northern California

With abundant water in the north state, this drone video by John Hannon brings out the beauty of the Upper Sacramento River, from Mount Shasta to Shasta Lake, including Hedge Creek Falls in Dunsmuir.
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With abundant water in the north state, this drone video by John Hannon brings out the beauty of the Upper Sacramento River, from Mount Shasta to Shasta Lake, including Hedge Creek Falls in Dunsmuir.

Mount Shasta residents no longer have to boil water after E. coli bacteria was detected in the city’s water supply late last week.

“Repeat samples show no E.coli or fecal coliform bacteria in the Mount Shasta spring source,” Andrew DiLuccia, a spokesman for the State Water Resources Control Board, said Tuesday. The state agency conducted water tests at the city’s request.

The city of Mount Shasta put out a notice this weekend warning residents to bring all water to a boil after routine sampling found a trace amount of E. coli in a routine water sample on Friday.

The drinking-water crisis came at a terrible time for the small, tourist-dependent mountain town, 3 1/2 hours north of Sacramento. This weekend marks the city’s annual Fourth of July holiday festivities, which draw thousands of tourists to the city for festivals, fireworks and a five-mile run in the shadow of Mount Shasta.

Some restaurants reportedly closed because they couldn’t ensure diners’ safety.

Mount Shasta, called "the Woodstock of spirituality," has long been a mountain of mystery, attracting an assortment of spiritual questers. The believers come by the thousands, searching and exploring the giant peak’s myth and magic. They come fro

Ryan Sabalow: 916-321-1264, @ryansabalow

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