Local

Uh, oh, Placer County treehouse kitchen must go

Mike Splinter's Granite Bay treehouse was recently featured in the show Treehouse Masters, where an expert builder constructs a treehouse at someone's home.
Mike Splinter's Granite Bay treehouse was recently featured in the show Treehouse Masters, where an expert builder constructs a treehouse at someone's home. The Sacramento Bee

The candy kitchen from the nationally televised “Christmas Candy Kitchen Treehouse” built for a Placer County couple will have to come out, Placer County officials said.

In November, acclaimed treehouse builder Pete Nelson constructed a 500-square-foot treehouse featuring a full-working kitchen, bath and loft for the Splinter family of Granite Bay on his television program “Treehouse Masters,” which airs on the Animal Planet cable channel. The episode – complete with the affable Nelson making candy with the Splinter family – aired in December.

Now the county says that because the Splinters already have a guest home on their property, they’ll have to remove the kitchen appliances and loft mattress from the treehouse before the county can sign off on the construction.

“The kitchen has to be removed,” said E.J. Ivaldi, the county’s deputy planning director.

Stoked by fond memories of his childhood treehouse, Mike Splinter and his wife, Pat, initially contacted Nelson Treehouse and Supply in hopes of having a grandkid-centric treehouse built, but later turned to the television program. Show producers pounced on the Splinters’ three-generations-old family tradition of making hard candy before Christmas and built the episode around it.

The Splinters and show producers worked with the county through the construction process and, as with any significant home construction, the county must grant final approval after the work is done to ensure compliance with local laws. That final approval has yet to come.

Mike Splinter declined comment Friday.

If the Splinters didn’t already have a secondary dwelling on the property, approving the treehouse as designed might have been an option, Ivaldi said.

“They can use it for entertaining,” Ivaldi said “What the county approved was a residential accessory structure. For the purpose of them being able to do a TV show, they were allowed to build a kitchen with the understanding that the kitchen would come out.”

Call The Bee’s Ed Fletcher, (916)321-1269. Follow him on Twitter @NewsFletch.

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

  Comments