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Weekend catch-up: 7 stories you don’t want to miss

Balloons are tied to kayaks to stand out to its owners at the Sacramento Bar Park on the American Riverat the 43rd annual Eppie's Great Race on Saturday, July 16, 2016, in Sacramento.
Balloons are tied to kayaks to stand out to its owners at the Sacramento Bar Park on the American Riverat the 43rd annual Eppie's Great Race on Saturday, July 16, 2016, in Sacramento. aseng@sacbee.com

Here are seven stories from the weekend that you will want to catch up on before the work week hits.

1) New activists create challenges – and opportunity – for Black Lives Matter

While numbers make the Black Lives Matter movement stronger, surges of neophytes make it hard to keep the organization’s identity and message focused. It highlights an ongoing debate born out of the Occupy movement about the value and consequences of social media in political activism.

Led by Tanya Faison, Sacramento Black Lives Matter protesters say local police fatal shootings deserve scrutiny. Some 60 protesters gathered in front of police headquarters Saturday.

2) Could California’s new gun control laws be blocked by voters?

Referendums were filed late Friday to overturn a sweeping package of gun control bills signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown earlier this month, possibly stalling the laws until voters weigh in.

New California laws will broaden the definition of prohibited assault weapons, cracking down on a quick-reloading device referred to as the "bullet button."

3) Should rule-breaking cyclists be sent to bike traffic school?

Bicyclists ticketed for unsafe riding should be allowed to attend bike traffic school instead of being hit with a big fine, a Sacramento city councilman says.

Sacramento city officials try to clarify when bicyclists are allowed on sidewalks

4) A talker: Sacramento mayor pays for burial of man killed by city police

Mayor Kevin Johnson helped a south Sacramento mother pay the funeral costs for her son, who was killed by police in April.

5) Popular on Twitter: A tale of two exonerees: Their struggles to be paid for years spent in prison

Courts found that Larry Pohlschneider and Timothy Atkins were both wrongfully convicted of crimes and they were freed with the help of Innocence Network organizations. Recent legal changes guaranteed Pohlschneider money for his time in prison, but Atkins may never be paid.

An exonerated Larry Pohlschneider got his first hair cut as a free man in Sacramento after his release in October 2015.

6) Popular on Facebook: West Sacramento police officers use hip-hop to build community ties

The West Sacramento Police Department has become the first capital-area law enforcement agency to participate in a viral video challenge sweeping the country.

Citing the strained relationship between some communities and the law enforcement agencies in the wake of questionable in-custody deaths, the West Sacramento police department jumped at making a Running Man Challenge video. The video features doze

7) Popular on video: Yuba County creates 'tiny homes' for some of its homeless population

Nearly a dozen homeless people in the Marysville area left their tent encampment for a “tiny home” village that aims to help residents get the help they need to re-enter the workforce.

Yuba County created "tiny homes" for some of it's homeless population. The county opened the doors on July 15, 2016. The house are a collaboration with the city and Habitat for Humanity.

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