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Sutter County resident dies of complications from West Nile virus

How to stay safe from mosquitoes

Zika and West Nile viruses are both transmitted by mosquitoes. Officials from public health and from Sacramento-Yolo vector control explain how to protect yourself from bites.
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Zika and West Nile viruses are both transmitted by mosquitoes. Officials from public health and from Sacramento-Yolo vector control explain how to protect yourself from bites.

A Sutter County resident has died of complications related to West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease contracted over the summer, county public health officials said Wednesday.

It was the first West Nile virus-related death reported in Sutter County this year.

Eleven human cases of West Nile virus have been reported in Sutter County for 2016 and a total of 41 cases since 2007, according to a county Public Health Division news release. This is the fifth death related to the virus recorded since West Nile virus was first reported in Sutter County, officials said.

The risk for West Nile virus, spread through mosquito bites, continues into late fall for humans, horses and other mammals, but the Sutter-Yuba Mosquito and Vector Control District reported that tests for the virus show little or no activity in the county at this time due to the colder weather.

Residents are encouraged, however, to take precautions, particularly in warmer weather.

To reduce the risk of mosquito bites, health officials urge using a mosquito repellent, avoid being outdoors at dusk or dawn when mosquitoes are most active, make sure screens on doors and windows are not broken or torn, and drain all exterior standing water.

Zika and West Nile viruses are both transmitted by mosquitoes. Officials from public health and from Sacramento-Yolo vector control explain how to protect yourself from bites.

Cathy Locke: 916-321-5287, @lockecathy

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