Education

Rainy weather pushes back Sac State construction project, to commuters’ frustration

A rendering of planned Parking Structure V at Sacramento State. Clark Pacific's construction has been delayed by rain, and will not meet the March 26 deadline.
A rendering of planned Parking Structure V at Sacramento State. Clark Pacific's construction has been delayed by rain, and will not meet the March 26 deadline.

It appears that Sacramento State students will have to wait a little longer for parking relief on campus, as recent rainstorms have washed away hopes that a major construction project would finish on time.

Completion of the long-awaited Parking Structure V was delayed again this week, The State Hornet reported Thursday. The six-story, 1,750-space structure adjacent to the university's athletic center was first announced in September 2016 and began construction last June.

The intent was to have it finished by this January, in time for the beginning of the spring semester. Construction was delayed, with a completion date of Monday, March 26, projected in February, according to The State Hornet.

Notably, the school's contract with West Sacramento-based builder Clark Pacific expires on April 5. University Transportation and Parking Services Director Tony Lucas told the campus newspaper it'll now probably take until late April.

Though most of what remains is just pouring concrete, asphalt and signage, wet and stormy weather made Monday's target deadline unattainable. As is always the case, time is money: a facilities project manager told The State Hornet that it'll cost Sac State an estimated $5,500 extra for each day of work needed past April 5.

Sacramento State's parking situation is notoriously bad—so bad that campus officials had to provide an online app to give real-time parking info to students—and is always at its worst the first few weeks of each semester, when campus population is at its highest and new students are still settling in.

The university is considered largely a commuter campus with a majority of students driving to school. The closest light rail station, on 65th Street, is still a mile walk from campus—an issue that university and city transportation officials are hoping can be solved by driverless, robot shuttle buses.

Nearly 1,800 new spaces will undoubtedly ease some of the school's student parking woes. In the meantime, university transportation officials have had to piece together other options in the meantime, including off-campus parking sites like the McAuliffe baseball complex (11 acres of which were recently acquired by University Enterprises, Inc., for a student housing project).

A new welcome center will be built next to Parking Structure V. That project is scheduled to finish ahead of the fall 2019 semester.

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