Education

CSU trustees approve overhaul of Sacramento State campus

Work to bring new facilities to the Sacramento State campus – building on previous projects such as these apartment-style dorms under construction in 2009 – are listed in a new master plan that looks 20 years into the future.
Work to bring new facilities to the Sacramento State campus – building on previous projects such as these apartment-style dorms under construction in 2009 – are listed in a new master plan that looks 20 years into the future. lsterling@sacbee.com

California State University trustees Wednesday approved a major plan to overhaul the Sacramento State campus over the next 20 years by building new academic and administrative facilities and expanding student amenities.

The plan is ambitious: 1.3 million square feet of new construction that includes student and faculty housing, a performing arts center, a student events center and additional parking structures, as well as new science and engineering buildings.

Projects would paid by student fees, and state and private funds, much of which still need to be approved or identified. If everything is built, it would cost $3.7 billion in today’s dollars, according to Victor Takahashi, director of facilities, planning and construction for California State University, Sacramento.

The plan calls for eight new housing complexes and the renovation of seven aging buildings, including several academic halls and the library. The university plans to demolish its five oldest residence halls within 20 years and replace them with new dorms.

The plan also calls for the eventual expansion of the University Union, arboretum and The Well, the student fitness center.

Five years

▪ Riverfront dorm: A four-story residence hall with 416 beds for freshmen and sophomores is expected to be the next addition to North Housing Village. The 126,000-square-foot building will cost $54.9 million and will be funded through housing fees charged to students residing on campus. The dorm will have views of the American River.

▪ Science building: It would be built on a parking lot along the American River, just north of the student bookstore, with modern classrooms, laboratories and amenities. The building would be state-funded.

10 years

▪ Engineering building: It would house the engineering and computer sciences departments. The building would replace Humboldt Hall, which would be demolished once all the programs are relocated to the new building. The building would be state-funded.

▪ Performing arts center: The new performance space would house a theater, stage, storage, classrooms and practice rooms. It would be state-funded.

▪ Children’s center: A larger child care center would be situated just south of the Alumni Center, on the south side of the campus. The existing center would be demolished.

▪ Student events center: The venue would offer space for athletic competitions, concerts and graduations, among other events. It would have a 6,000-seat arena, offices, retail areas, locker rooms, storage and dining facilities.

15 years

▪ Administration and student services: The new building would consolidate the two departments. It would serve as a clearly defined north entry and improve the campus’ “front door,” according to the master plan.

▪ Faculty housing: A new housing project called South Housing Village would offer apartments for faculty, staff and graduate students. The village would consist mostly of two-bedroom apartments.

▪ Hornet Stadium: Permanent seating would replace the bleachers at the stadium and retail space would be added.

20 years

▪ Student housing: Four additional dorms housing a total of 1,200 students in the South Housing Village. These are expected to be two-bedroom apartments with a new parking structure.

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