Health & Medicine

Mosquito samples near Zamora, Isleton test positive for West Nile virus

How to stay safe from mosquitoes

Zika and West Nile viruses are both transmitted by mosquitoes. Officials from public health and from Sacramento-Yolo vector control explain how to protect yourself from bites.
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Zika and West Nile viruses are both transmitted by mosquitoes. Officials from public health and from Sacramento-Yolo vector control explain how to protect yourself from bites.

Two mosquito samples have tested positive for West Nile virus, according to the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District.

According to the report, the mosquitoes were collected near Zamora in northern Yolo County and near Isleton in south Sacramento County.

“It’s important for residents to take these findings seriously because it confirms the presence of the virus within our area,” said Gary Goodman, district manager.

As the weather in the region grows hotter, it is likely that the number of mosquitoes will also increase.

According to Goodman, mosquitoes can complete their life cycles in just four to seven days in hot temperatures. A single female mosquito, which lays 50 to 200 eggs at a time, can quickly produce a great number of mosquitoes, increasing the risk of infection.

The organization encourages members of the community to take proper precautions.

“As people enjoy outdoor activities during the warm spring evenings, it’s important to remember that the best protection against mosquito bites is an effective insect repellent,” said Goodman.

In response to the findings, the district will increase its mosquito trapping and monitoring in the area to find where mosquitoes may be breeding. Adult mosquito control may also be conducted to decrease the numbers of adult mosquitoes.

Jacob Sweet: 916-321-1052, @_jacobsweet

For information about Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District activities, go to www.FIGHTtheBITE.net.

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