Health & Medicine

Woodland spraying slated as West Nile virus is confirmed in two Yolo County residents

Aerial spraying for mosquitoes will be conducted this week in Woodland after health officials said two Yolo County residents have tested positive for West Nile virus. Spraying is scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday from about 8 p.m. to midnight over Woodland and surrounding agricultural areas.
Aerial spraying for mosquitoes will be conducted this week in Woodland after health officials said two Yolo County residents have tested positive for West Nile virus. Spraying is scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday from about 8 p.m. to midnight over Woodland and surrounding agricultural areas. CDC/ James Gathany

Aerial spraying for mosquitoes will be conducted this week in Woodland after health officials said two Yolo County residents have tested positive for West Nile virus.

The two infected residents have not shown any symptoms, but Yolo County officials cautioned that the virus can pose serious health risks.

“Our surveillance results show high virus infection rates among mosquitoes and aerial treatments to reduce the number of infected mosquitoes are needed to protect citizens,” said Gary Goodman, manager of the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito & Vector Control District.

Spraying is scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday from about 8 p.m. to midnight over Woodland and surrounding agricultural areas.

Most people infected with West Nile virus will experience no symptoms, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, about 20 percent of those infected will develop a fever along with other symptoms, such as headache or body pain; less than 1 percent will develop a serious, sometimes fatal, neurological illness, such as encephalitis or meningitis.

In the past 16 years, the CDC said, there have been 1,765 reported deaths from West Nile virus nationwide.

To avoid getting bitten, residents should wear mosquito repellant when outdoors, particularly at dawn or dusk when mosquitoes are most active and biting. The CDC recommends mosquito repellants that contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus products.

Bill Lindelof: 916-321-1079, @Lindelofnews

  Comments