The study, published Feb. 22 in the journal Cancer Causes Control, suggests that race, ethnicity, genetics, culture and lifestyle choices could all affect cancer risk, according to a statement by Mariana Stern, senior author and director of graduate programs in molecular epidemiology at USC’s Keck School of Medicine.
The study, published Feb. 22 in the journal Cancer Causes Control, suggests that race, ethnicity, genetics, culture and lifestyle choices could all affect cancer risk, according to a statement by Mariana Stern, senior author and director of graduate programs in molecular epidemiology at USC’s Keck School of Medicine. Kim Kim Foster-Tobin The State Columbia, S.C.
The study, published Feb. 22 in the journal Cancer Causes Control, suggests that race, ethnicity, genetics, culture and lifestyle choices could all affect cancer risk, according to a statement by Mariana Stern, senior author and director of graduate programs in molecular epidemiology at USC’s Keck School of Medicine. Kim Kim Foster-Tobin The State Columbia, S.C.