City Beat

Council approves new dog park for midtown Sacramento

Ivana Bisel walks her dog Rocky, an Olde English Bulldog, past a vacant lot at the corner at 19th and Q Streets in Midtown Sacramento, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. The Sacramento City Council approved a plan Tuesday night to construct a dog park and community garden in the long-vacant plot and will name the park after civic watchdog and longtime midtown activist Brooks Truitt.
Ivana Bisel walks her dog Rocky, an Olde English Bulldog, past a vacant lot at the corner at 19th and Q Streets in Midtown Sacramento, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. The Sacramento City Council approved a plan Tuesday night to construct a dog park and community garden in the long-vacant plot and will name the park after civic watchdog and longtime midtown activist Brooks Truitt. lsterling@sacbee.com

The latest midtown development project is for the dogs.

The Sacramento City Council approved a plan Tuesday night to construct a dog park and community garden in a new park that replaces a long-vacant plot on the southwest corner of 19th and Q streets. The city will name the park after civic watchdog and longtime midtown activist Brooks Truitt.

The lot borders two light-rail lines and is a half-block from a Safeway shopping center. It’s also close to a large residential development in the works. Developer Sotiris Kolokotronis is planning to build up to 550 residences on a multiblock project that is expected to be under construction in a few months.

Midtown dog owners have been pushing for a dog park in the neighborhood. Laura Braden, a central city resident and a spokeswoman for the Sacramento Kings, said the park would become a natural gathering spot for the neighborhood. And with a community garden and public art integrated into the plan, the park would be a “model for innovative placemaking.”

In addition to the garden and dog park, the new spot will have a 3,000-square-foot public plaza. The design costs for the park are estimated at $800,000.

The design and construction of the park will be funded by fees the city collects from developers building new projects in the neighborhood.

Councilman Steve Hansen, who represents the central city, asked that the park be named after Truitt, who was instrumental in the preservation of many historic buildings along nearby R Street and elsewhere in the area. Truitt died in May 2014 at the age of 89.

“A lot of the things we’re seeing come to fruition (in midtown) were because of his dogged leadership and in knowing there was more to this area than just a warehouse district or just some state offices,” Hansen said. “Brooks was a hero to many and helped preserve so much.”

Ryan Lillis: 916-321-1085, @Ryan_Lillis

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