In this Dec. 8, 2018, photo, Adilgazy Yergazy, a farmer, holds up pictures of his detained younger brothers at his home in a village near Almaty, Kazakhstan. The Kazakhstan Foreign Ministry says China is allowing more than 2,000 ethnic Kazakhs to abandon their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, a sign that Beijing may be starting to feel a mounting backlash against a sweeping crackdown on Muslims in its far west region of Xinjiang. Yergazy says two of his little brothers were arrested and taken to internment camps last year, and that one was recently released from the camps but is unable to leave China.
In this Dec. 8, 2018, photo, Adilgazy Yergazy, a farmer, holds up pictures of his detained younger brothers at his home in a village near Almaty, Kazakhstan. The Kazakhstan Foreign Ministry says China is allowing more than 2,000 ethnic Kazakhs to abandon their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, a sign that Beijing may be starting to feel a mounting backlash against a sweeping crackdown on Muslims in its far west region of Xinjiang. Yergazy says two of his little brothers were arrested and taken to internment camps last year, and that one was recently released from the camps but is unable to leave China. Dake Kang AP Photo
In this Dec. 8, 2018, photo, Adilgazy Yergazy, a farmer, holds up pictures of his detained younger brothers at his home in a village near Almaty, Kazakhstan. The Kazakhstan Foreign Ministry says China is allowing more than 2,000 ethnic Kazakhs to abandon their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, a sign that Beijing may be starting to feel a mounting backlash against a sweeping crackdown on Muslims in its far west region of Xinjiang. Yergazy says two of his little brothers were arrested and taken to internment camps last year, and that one was recently released from the camps but is unable to leave China. Dake Kang AP Photo