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The internet doesn’t know how to feel about Mr. Clean’s ‘sexy’ new commercial

Mr. C's Sexy Dream Team and #TheNextMrClean Mike Jackson, center, clean up Times Square to celebrate the debut of Mr. Clean's Super Bowl ad on Thursday January 26, 2017 in New York.
Mr. C's Sexy Dream Team and #TheNextMrClean Mike Jackson, center, clean up Times Square to celebrate the debut of Mr. Clean's Super Bowl ad on Thursday January 26, 2017 in New York. Invision for Mr. Clean

Get ready to look at mopping the floor in a whole new way.

In the run up to the Super Bowl on Feb. 5, dozens of companies are rushing to generate buzz for themselves by releasing advertisements that are funny, emotional or downright edgy. And while the big game is still more than a week away, cleaning brand Mr. Clean clearly has the early edge in that regard.

Mr. Clean, which is owned by manufacturing company Procter & Gamble, released the following ad Friday.

In the ad, a suburban woman appears to be frustrated by a stain on her stove, before Mr. Clean, the iconic mascot of the brand, shows up in all his erotic CGI glory.

As sensual music plays, the two characters clean the house, culminating in Mr. Clean mopping the floor in extremely tight pants that, um, show off his assets. The ad ends with the reveal that Mr. Clean is actually the woman’s significant other, with the tagline, “You Gotta Love a Man Who Cleans.”

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The idea behind the whole ad is to make cleaning attractive to men and challenge the idea that women are the only ones who would be interested in a cleaning product, per AdAge.

“There's no better way to reach a co-ed audience than the Super Bowl," Procter & Gamble vice president Martin Hettich told the website. "And the subject we're broaching with Mr. Clean really is for a co-ed audience, because it's talking about cleaning and how men and women divide up the chores. And there's still a way to go."

According to data compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2014, 83 percent of women reported doing household work, while just 65 percent of men said the same, per Time Magazine.

Online, however, the ad was met with a broad range of reactions. Some appreciated the cheeky re-branding of the character, while others described themselves as uncomfortable with the idea of a sexualized Mr. Clean.

Either way, the video has been a success in driving conversation about the brand, as it racked up nearly 450,000 views in a day on YouTube. However, the video did seem to shift attention from Procter & Gamble’s announcement Tuesday that a new flesh-and-blood actor had been cast to play the real-life Mr. Clean in the future. Mike Jackson, the company’s choice, is African-American, marking a first in the brand’s history, per Yahoo News.

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