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This WWII anti-Nazi film went viral after deadly Charlottesville protests

Here's the U.S. government film 'Don't Be A Sucker' that went viral after Charlottesville clashes

In 1943, the United States government published a World War II video against fascism. Today, after the riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left three people dead and dozens injured, the film has gone viral.
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In 1943, the United States government published a World War II video against fascism. Today, after the riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left three people dead and dozens injured, the film has gone viral.

In 1943, the United States government published a World War II video against fascism. Today, after the riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left three people dead and dozens injured, the film has gone viral.

“Don’t Be A Sucker” is a 17-minute cautionary tale created to illustrate how Americans could lose their country over hatred and xenophobia. The short movie was produced by the U.S. War Department in 1943 and rereleased in an updated form in 1947.

Michael Oman-Reagan, a Canadian researcher and anthropologist, tweeted a clip of “Don’t Be A Sucker.” The tweet has since been shared nearly 120,000 times, according to the Washington Post.

Another clip of the film reached the top of Reddit’s home page Sunday night, the Washington Post noted. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), told his followers “PLEASE WATCH THIS!”

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) also linked events in Charlottesville to World War II.

David Caraccio: 916-321-1125, @DavidCaraccio

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