National

‘They had the prayers shot right out of them’: Backlash begins after church shooting

Trump on Texas shooting victims' families: We will never leave their side

President Trump, who was traveling in Japan, delivered remarks on the church massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas. He called it a "horrible and murderous attack" and an "act of evil."
Up Next
President Trump, who was traveling in Japan, delivered remarks on the church massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas. He called it a "horrible and murderous attack" and an "act of evil."

Politicians across the United States and around the world responded on social media to a mass shooting Sunday at a Texas church, but some of the comments further inflamed a backlash against “thoughts and prayers” in the wake of yet another shooting tragedy.

A gunman opened fire in a South Texas church Sunday, killing at least 20 people at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, which is about 30 miles southeast of San Antonio.

On Sunday a gunman identified as Devin Kelley opened fire at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, TX leaving at least 27 dead and 30 injured.

President Donald Trump posted to Twitter that he is monitoring the situation from Japan as he embarks on a tour of Asia.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Paul Ryan, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, offered prayers for the victims. Abbott also thanked law enforcement for the response.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also offered his condolences to the victims.

Following a trend that arose after a gunman killed 59 at an Oct. 1 music festival in Las Vegas, some posters on social media lashed out against calls for thoughts and prayers.

But others criticized the backlash.

Former President Barack Obama seemed to try to straddle the divide, tweeting that he prayed for action on better gun laws.

  Comments