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She followed her GPS – right into the Neversink River

Rik Paul tests GPS systems in New York in April. Another driver found herself in trouble Sunday night when her GPS navigator led her straight into a river.
Rik Paul tests GPS systems in New York in April. Another driver found herself in trouble Sunday night when her GPS navigator led her straight into a river. The New York Times file

A 30-year-old woman was shocked when she followed her GPS navigator’s directions – and nearly drowned Sunday night.

“I saw water hit my windshield and then looked around and realized I was in water,” she told The Daily Freeman. “Drowning has always been one of my worst fears.”

Unable to open her car door or window, she called 911 as her vehicle floated down the Neversink River in New York.

The Huguenot Fire Department responded and, with the help of the Point Jervis Water Operations Team, rescued the driver, who did not wish to be identified, the paper said. She was treated at the scene and released.

In 2016, a 23-year-old Canadian woman drove into a frigid Ontario bay at the direction of her GPS navigator, reported ABC News. She crawled out her window and made it to shore.

In 2009, Robert Jones wound up teetering on the edge of a 100-foot-cliff in West Yorkshire, England, after his GPS naviagtor insisted a footpath was actually a road, reported The Daily Mail. He escaped unscathed but a recovery team spent nine hours hauling his BMW back from the brink.

And in 2006, a German motorist followed his GPS navigator past several construction signs right into a pile of sand, reported News.com.au.

In California, several deaths have resulted from drivers attempting to cross Death Valley unprepared at the behest of their GPS navigators, reported The Sacramento Bee in 2006.

Of course, there’s also an episode of “The Office” in which uptight manager Michael Scott follows his GPS navigator into a lake while shouting, “The machine knows where it’s going!”

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