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Someone threw out his clam chowder. He called 911 about it – five times

Sok Yi, 70, called 911 four times Monday to complain that someone threw out his clam chowder. When officers cited him, he called 911 again, Connecticut police say.
Sok Yi, 70, called 911 four times Monday to complain that someone threw out his clam chowder. When officers cited him, he called 911 again, Connecticut police say. The Akron Beacon-Journal file

Someone threw Sok Yi’s clam chowder into a trash bin, he said, so the 70-year-old man called 911 about it.

In fact, Yi called 911 dispatchers four times Monday to yell and scream about his soup, Middletown, Conn., police told WCVB. He told police he called 911 because he had no other phone number to contact police. And when officers issued him a misdemeanor summons on suspicion of misusing the 911 system, Yi called 911 again an hour later to complain about it.

Officers sent to his home said they found Yi intoxicated in his bed, but he said he did not require assistance and complained again about the summons, WCVB reported. Officers arrested Yi on suspicion of misusing 911 and interfering with police after he refused to cooperate with officers trying to handcuff and arrest him. He was later released on a promise to appear in court March 12 on the charges.

Police in Woodfin, N.C., arrested Henry Herman Harris, 75, on Tuesday after he called 911 to threaten to shoot police with an AK-47, reported The Asheville Citizen Times. Harris had become angry after an officer escorted a fire marshal and city official inspecting his home, police said. Police have received 81 911 calls from his home since the start of 2018, police said.

In Victorville, Calif., police arrested Shakera Withers, 23, on Feb. 25 on suspicion of misusing 911 after she made several calls requesting rides, sheriff’s officials told the Victor Valley News. Withers, who is homeless, first requested a ride to a hospital at 11:30 p.m., telling deputies she had nowhere else to go, but then was unhappy with the facility.

“Withers has made several calls to 911 asking for rides to various places and giving false information to achieve this,” Mara Rodriguez, spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, told the publication. Withers called 911 five times in connection with the most recent incident.

An estimated 240 million 911 calls are made in the United States each year, according to the National Emergency Number Association.

Do you know what to do if you accidentally dial 911? Do you know what information is crucial in an emergency? Here's what you need to know in North Texas to get the police, fire or ambulance service you need fast.

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