National

Why people are recording themselves waking their friends, and how it might save lives

How to prevent a home fire in the winter

Home fires are more prevalent in winter than in any other season. This is due in part to an increase in cooking and heating fires. Holiday decorations and winter storms that can interrupt electrical service and cause people to turn to alternative
Up Next
Home fires are more prevalent in winter than in any other season. This is due in part to an increase in cooking and heating fires. Holiday decorations and winter storms that can interrupt electrical service and cause people to turn to alternative

A challenge is on to have people "wake up" to the dangers of house fires.

In an attempt to raise awareness, the American Red Cross is issuing the Wake Up Challenge. The humanitarian organization says 31 percent of people caught in house fires don't wake up. Through donations and video posts with the hashtag #wakeupchallenge, the goal is to install free smoke alarms in at-risk homes and help fire victims across the U.S.

The challenge, which began last month, was highlighted on ABC's "Jimmy Kimmel Live" on Wednesday night.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FDZzCJqq2B8" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>

It only takes two minutes for a house fire to threaten lives, and five to engulf the home, according to ready.gov. A working smoke alarm increases the likelihood of survival, especially with proper maintenance. More about home fire safety and prevention can be found on the site.

To take part in the Red Cross' challenge, there's a three-step process:

Wake up someone (and get it on video)

Post your video and tag friends

Donate to help install free smoke alarms and help fire victims

For more information on the Wake Up Challenge, visit redcross.org/wakeup.

  Comments