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Early 2018 midterms winners make history long before election ends

Members of Congress and governors elected in the 2018 midterm elections made history as the first gay governor, youngest woman elected to Congress, first Native American woman (Sharice Davids, pictured above) in Congress and more, early in the night.
Members of Congress and governors elected in the 2018 midterm elections made history as the first gay governor, youngest woman elected to Congress, first Native American woman (Sharice Davids, pictured above) in Congress and more, early in the night. AP

From the first Native American woman in the U.S. Congress to the first openly gay male governor, a slate of diverse candidates has produced several “firsts.” And as the results continue to come in, there could be more historic elections.

Sharice Davids beat incumbent Republican Kevin Yoder in Kansas’ 3rd Congressional District — making her both the first Native American woman elected to U.S. Congress and the first gay Native American woman to do the same, reports The Kansas City Star.

And in Colorado, Democrat Jared Polis became the first openly gay man to win a governor’s race, Vox reported.

Buzzfeed News projected Democrat Chris Pappas will be New Hampshire’s first openly gay member of the U.S. House.

Congress will also have its youngest-ever female member: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won Tuesday in the heavily-Democratic New York City congressional district where she beat Rep. Joe Crowley — a member of House Democratic leadership — in a primary earlier this year, CNN reported.

Kansas 3rd Congressional District candidate, Democrat Sharice Davids, talks about the campaign and her White House fellowship.

Rashida Tlaib became Congress’ first Muslim woman following her election to Michigan’s 13th Congressional District, which covers parts of Detroit and its suburbs, according to USA Today. Back in 2008, Tlaib was also a trailblazer as the first woman in Michigan’s legislature.

Right behind Tlaib was another Muslim woman, Minnesota’s Ilhan Omar, who won on election night in her Minneapolis-area district to become the first Somali-American to join Congress, the Star Tribune reported.

Democrat Ayanna Pressley’s congressional win in Massachusetts makes her the first black woman to represent the state in the House, HuffPost reported. Like Ocasio-Cortez, Pressley beat out a long-time congressman in a primary upset to make history.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn was one of the few GOP firsts, beating her Democratic opponent to become the first female senator from Tennessee, Fox News reported. Blackburn replaces retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema could also make history as the first openly bisexual senator if she bests Republican U.S. Rep. Martha McSally in Arizona, according to CBS News. She is already the first-ever openly bisexual member of Congress. But whoever wins will become the first female senator in the state’s history.

If she wins in Georgia, Democrat Stacy Abrams would become the nation’s first-ever black woman to become the governor of a state. And Democrat Andrew Gillum would have been Florida’s first black governor — but he conceded to Republican Ron DeSantis.

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