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Pitiful alligator in Georgia swamp illustrates just how bad pollen gets in the South

How bad is pollen in the southeast? Check out this poor Georgia alligator. Facebook screenshot.
How bad is pollen in the southeast? Check out this poor Georgia alligator. Facebook screenshot.

A photo posted this week on Facebook of a sad looking Georgia alligator covered in pollen is illustrating just how miserable allergy season can be this time of year in the Southeast.

The moment was captured recently at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge, which shared the image Monday, in coastal Georgia. The 2,762-acre marsh is 45 miles southwest of Savannah.

“When your gators are covered in pollen, you know it’s spring on the GA coast!” posted Mary Monroe Glenn of Spartanburg, S.C., who was credited as the photographer by TV station WTOC.

It’s tree pollen season in the South, when yellowish-green dust famously falls like snow, giving allergy sufferers headaches and sticking to everything from windshields to people’s hair.

The dust recently fell so thick in the South Carolina town of Lamar that the mayor believed her car had been vandalized with spray paint, reported The State in Columbia. Police decided the yellowish “powder” was more likely pollen, the newspaper reported.

In the case of the Georgia alligator, it appears to have emerged from the swamp carrying a floating layer of pollen on its back.

The photo has been shared hundreds of times on Facebook and reaction has largely been sympathy for the alligator’s predicament.

“I can’t imagine the noise an alligator makes when it sneezes,” posted Beth Volpert Johansen on the refuge’s Facebook page.

“My eyes are itching just looking at that,” wrote Terica Davenport.

“There is no relief, no respite from the yellow curse this time of year,” said Jeanne Pyle Conrade.

“It is terrible this year. I usually don’t have problems with seasonal allergies, but that’s a different story this year,” posted Tracy Kessler on Facebook.

A North Carolina “swamp park” has posted a video explaining how alligators survive in a frozen pond and it’s both creepy and bizarre. The cold-blooded devils essentially allow themselves to be frozen in place, with their noses just above the surfa

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