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‘I’ve never seen a gangster that looked like a snowboarder,’ judge tells Crip ‘wannabe’

‘I don’t think you’d make a very good Crip,’ judge says to ‘wannabe’

Logan Nettles pleaded guilty to aggravated assault and gang charges and was sentenced to a year behind bars on Monday, March 18, 2019, for the July 2017 pistol-whipping of his father at their Lizella home.
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Logan Nettles pleaded guilty to aggravated assault and gang charges and was sentenced to a year behind bars on Monday, March 18, 2019, for the July 2017 pistol-whipping of his father at their Lizella home.

A young man whose jailhouse mugshot featured a bushy nest of orange hair and whose resemblance to the comic “Carrot Top” earned him the same nickname in law enforcement and online-commenting circles here, pleaded guilty Monday.

Logan Riley Nettles, 20, was sentenced to a year behind bars for participating in street-gang activity and for aggravated assault in connection with a 2017 attack on his father at their Lizella-area home.

Nettles’ reddish tumbleweed of a mane has since been cropped, but his appearance seemed to strike Bibb County Superior Court Judge Howard Z. Simms as peculiar for a supposed gang member.

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Logan Nettles in Bibb County Superior Court on Monday. Joe Kovac Jr. jkovac@macon.com

“So you’re a Crip, Mr. Nettles?” the judge asked. “Or do you just want to be a Crip?”

Nettles shook his head no and offered little semblance of an answer.

Nettles was jailed in July 2017 after allegedly pistol-whipping and threatening to kill his father at their Briar Creek Trail mobile home south of Lake Tobesofkee and U.S. 80 on the county’s west side.

The authorities at the time said the father, Clint B. Nettles, then 47, informed investigators that his son had struck him in the head with a handgun and told him, “Next time I will kill you.” The episode happened days after a Macon teen was reportedly shot and killed by another young man at the Nettles home.

Clint Nettles has since repeatedly told prosecutors that he fabricated his claim of being struck by his son. However, in recorded phone calls from jail the father and son were said to have discussed the incident.

In court Monday, prosecutor Nancy Scott Malcor said, “The father at one point, even when saying that he’s gonna get the charges dropped, said, ‘Well, you shouldn’t have tried to kill me.’”

Prosecutors agreed to a 10-year sentence for Logan Nettles, with all but one year on probation.

Under his first-offender-sentencing guidelines, Nettles could face a far stiffer 35-year maximum should he run afoul of the law anytime soon.

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Logan Nettles in Bibb County Superior Court on Monday. Joe Kovac Jr. jkovac@macon.com

After Malcor, the prosecutor, mentioned that Nettles’ gang affiliation was depicted in online photographs and spoken of in recorded phone calls from jail, the judge wanted to know more.

“So what is all that gangster stuff they saw you doing?” Simms asked Nettles. “Is that something you saw in the movies or learned on TV, what?”

Nettles again shook his head, his answer inaudible over the courtroom stir.

“I don’t think you’d make a very good Crip,” Simms said. “And as I understand it, (the Crips) don’t take very kindly to folks claiming that they are. ... Do they refer to them as wannabes? Is that the common street vernacular? Is that what you are, son?”

Nettles readily nodded and said, “Yeah.”

“Why?” the judge asked. “Why did you want to be a gangster?”

Nettles glanced at the floor and again shook his head, mustering little that approached a discernible answer.

“I’ve never seen a gangster,” Simms went on, “that looked like a snowboarder in my entire life.”

Nettles, whose auburn curls resemble those of Olympic snowboarding champion Shaun White, appeared to chuckle.

Simms, who is known for his oft-scathing admonishments of the convicted, cautioned Nettles against getting in trouble again.

“But based on what I’ve heard and seen about you,” Simms said, “unless you make some serious changes in your life, it is very likely (you will).”

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