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Ever heard of a super worm moon? Here’s how you can see it on the West Coast this week

See the beautiful, massive super blue blood moon set over Shell Beach

California got a special show early Wednesday, January 31, 2018 — an excellent view of the super blue blood moon and lunar eclipse, which hasn't happened since 1866. Here's a look at the moon setting over Shell Beach in San Luis Obispo County, Cal
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California got a special show early Wednesday, January 31, 2018 — an excellent view of the super blue blood moon and lunar eclipse, which hasn't happened since 1866. Here's a look at the moon setting over Shell Beach in San Luis Obispo County, Cal

If you look up in the sky Wednesday night, you’ll catch the super worm moon — and it’ll be the last supermoon for a while.

The moon is also special for another reason. The last time a full moon occurred so close to the vernal, or, spring equinox was in March 2000, when they were four hours apart. The last time the vernal equinox and full moon happened on the same day was March 20, 1981, according to the Farmer’s Almanac.

It will be visible all over the United States, and the best time to see the moon is just after sunset, according to National Geographic. On the West Coast, sunset is generally a little after 7 p.m. at this time of year.

In San Luis Obispo, sunset will be at 7:14 p.m., and in Sacramento at 7:17 p.m.

In Tacoma, Washington, sunset will be at 7:22 p.m. and in Boise, Idaho, sunset will be at 7:57 p.m. You can find this information for any city at timeanddate.com.

Rain is in the forecast for parts of California on Wednesday, including Sacramento, Fresno, Modesto, San Luis Obispo and Los Angeles — which could impact the view. Farther up the coast, in Washington state, skies in areas including Tacoma and Bellingham are generally expected to be clear to partly cloudy. Weather is also expected to be partly cloudy in Boise, Idaho.

A supermoon refers to either a new or full moon that coincides with the time of the month when the moon is at the closest point to Earth in its orbit, according to EarthSky.

The worm moon got its name because, at this time of year, the ground is soft enough for earthworms to appear, according to the Farmers’ Almanac.

The next supermoon after this one will occur on March 9, 2020, according to timeanddate.com.

If you’re not able to view the supermoon Wednesday, a live stream of the moon rising above Rome, Italy, will be available from the Virtual Telescope Project beginning at 9:45 a.m. Pacific Time.

The moon put on a rare cosmic show Wednesday: a red blue moon, super big and super bright. It was the first time in 35 years a blue moon has synced up with a supermoon and a total lunar eclipse, or blood moon because of its red hue.

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