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Real estate firm creates nuclear war house-hunting guide. It doesn’t go over well.

South Koreans watch a TV news program reporting on a North Korean nuclear test in 2016. A British real estate company’s attempt at a guide to buying a home with a potential nuclear apocalypse in mind has fallen flat.
South Koreans watch a TV news program reporting on a North Korean nuclear test in 2016. A British real estate company’s attempt at a guide to buying a home with a potential nuclear apocalypse in mind has fallen flat. The Associated Press file

A British real estate firm’s advice on finding the perfect house with a potential nuclear apocalypse in mind has fallen flat.

“A backyard nuclear bunker can be a cool edition to a property, but can also be a pain to construct so rather than hide away, homeowners can look to radiation free pockets of the nation to save themselves the trouble,” suggests emoov.co.uk in a press release, which came to light Thursday when an editor at The Times of London posted it to Twitter.

The release, which notes that Britain has little to fear – at least, directly – from escalating tensions between the U.S. and North Korea, includes a map created using NukeMap of potential targets and fallout zones for potential house-hunters.

Russell Quirk, founder and CEO of emoov.co.uk, conceded that post-apocalyptic home prices might be irrelevant. “That said, with buyer demand already at explosive levels compared to the ground zero stock levels available, a nuclear war could see these more affordable areas grow in value as demand for a house still standing outside of an impact zone increases,” he added.

Quirk also called the map and advice “just a bit of fun.”

Not everyone was laughing, however.

Others also questioned the actual usefulness of the map and suggestions in the event of an actual nuclear war.

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