Politics & Government

Traditional immigration hotbed California faces tough issues around wall, deportations

People pass graffiti along the border structure in Tijuana, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. President Donald Trump moved aggressively to tighten the nation’s immigration controls Wednesday, signing executive actions to jumpstart construction of his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall and cut federal grants for immigrant-protecting “sanctuary cities.”
People pass graffiti along the border structure in Tijuana, Mexico, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. President Donald Trump moved aggressively to tighten the nation’s immigration controls Wednesday, signing executive actions to jumpstart construction of his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall and cut federal grants for immigrant-protecting “sanctuary cities.” AP

Donald Trump swore up and down during his successful campaign for the presidency that he would push forward on stamping out illegal immigration and building a wall on the border with Mexico, while forcing the Mexicans to pay for it.

So far, barely a week into his term, Trump has forged ahead on those fronts – though Mexico is telling him to pay for his own wall, a tab that increasingly appears headed for the pockets of U.S. taxpayers.

The issues, however they stack up, are front and center nationally, in California and locally in the Sacramento region.

Here is previous coverage, including several Data Tracker features, that provides background and perspective on how control of the country’s border has become a defining issue.

Sacramento Bee databases

▪  Which Sacramento ​communities are home to the most undocumented immigrants?

▪  China surpasses Mexico in sending immigrants to California

▪  Border Patrol figures show huge drop in immigrants caught illegally crossing from Mexico into California

▪  Where they went: See the distribution of California's foreign-born residents

California State University undocumented students attended a forum at Sacramento State on Jan. 23, 2017 to discuss how federal changes could affect them.

Regional, state and national coverage

▪  California reacts to Trump immigration actions: ‘shameful,’‘unpatriotic’ and ‘un-American’

▪  Waves of immigrants – and immigration laws – have shaped the nation's identity

▪  Could California become a ‘sanctuary state’ under Trump?

▪  To GOP, Obama’s immigration orders were ‘executive overreach.’ What is it when Trump does it?

Dalya Abdullah, a bilingual instructional assistant at Howe Avenue Elementary School in Arden Arcade, discusses her work with refugee students.

Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto said on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, that he rejects the decision by President Donald Trump to build a border wall and repeated that his country would not pay for it.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, speaking with reporters on Air Force One en route to Andrews Air Force Base on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, said the Mexico border wall championed by President Donald Trump could be funded by tax on imports.

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