Capitol Alert

California Highway Patrol stresses neutral position on marijuana legalization

Gavin Newsom says California pot measure better than 2010 version

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom says the proponents of 2010's Proposition 19 deserve credit for starting a national dialogue. He says this year's campaign is better prepared. He spoke on May 4, 2016 at the campaign launch in San Francisco.
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Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom says the proponents of 2010's Proposition 19 deserve credit for starting a national dialogue. He says this year's campaign is better prepared. He spoke on May 4, 2016 at the campaign launch in San Francisco.

The California Highway Patrol on Friday clarified its stance on the marijuana legalization measure following criticism from within its ranks over the proposal’s lack of an established standard to detect stoned motorists.

Earlier this month, Doug Villars, president of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen, ripped Proposition 64 for not replicating other states by setting a legal driving limit, such as 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter in drivers’ blood. He called the 0.08 alcohol limit “a big deterrent” that saves lives.

CHP spokeswoman Fran Clader stressed the organization has not taken a formal position on Proposition 64, after providing technical assistance to the measure’s authors.

If approved by voters statewide, Proposition 64 would provide $15 million to the CHP over five years to “develop protocols and best practices for determining when a person is driving while impaired, including from marijuana use.”

The CHP is involved in implementing medical marijuana regulations signed by Gov. Jerry Brown last year.

Editor’s note: This post was updated to reflect an interview with Clader.

Christopher Cadelago: 916-326-5538, @ccadelago

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