Capitol Alert

AM Alert: A roundup of California laws that won’t take effect Jan. 1

Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation that will automatically enroll millions of private-sector workers in retirement saving accounts, as lawmakers and supporters look on, at the Capitol Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in Sacramento, Calif.
Gov. Jerry Brown signs legislation that will automatically enroll millions of private-sector workers in retirement saving accounts, as lawmakers and supporters look on, at the Capitol Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, in Sacramento, Calif. AP

While Californians ring in the New Year and toast the end of 2016, a handful of new laws touching everything from mascot names to minimum wage to assault weapons will begin to kick in.

But today, we bring you laws the Legislature passed last year that won’t take effect for at least a couple more months. Here is a handy list:

▪ Senate Bill 450: allows counties to mail ballots and open vote centers in lieu of polling places, beginning in 2018.

▪ Senate Bill 1046: requires DUI offenders to install an ignition interlock device on their car to receive a restricted license or to reinstate a license, starting in 2019.

▪ Senate Bill 1383: requires the Air Resources Board to approve and implement a short-lived climate pollutant strategy to reduce methane, hydrofluorocarbon gases and anthropogenic black carbon by 2030. The ARB needs to approve a strategy by Jan. 1 2018.

▪ Assembly Bill 857: requires registration and restricts the sale of homemade guns as of July 2018.

▪ Assembly Bill 908: increases compensation for paid family leave by 2018.

▪ Assembly Bill 1066: phases in overtime for farmworkers beginning in 2019.

▪ Assembly Bill 1732: requires single-use bathrooms to be designated all-gender as of March 2017.

WORTH REPEATING: “This project has been subjected to ... more environmental review than any other project in the history of the world.” – Gov. Jerry Brown, urging support his twin tunnels project to move forward

BY THE NUMBERS: Approved by California voters last month, Proposition 56 increases the excise taxes on cigarettes by $2 per pack of cigarettes beginning April 1, 2017. Officials at the Board of Equalization are worried about an increase in tobacco tax evasion. The agency estimates that cigarette tax evasion cost the state about $126 million in 2012-13, along with $88 million in lost tax on other tobacco products. In a recent draft request for more money to carry out Proposition 56, BOE staff voiced concerns “there will be a substantial growth in complaints and criminal cases related to cigarette and tobacco products tax evasion that will adversely impact state revenues.”

KWANZAA: Head to the John Burton hearing room (4203) at noon on Monday for a Kwanzaa celebration featuring keynote speaker Mathilde Mukantabana, Ambassador for the Republic of Rwanda to the United States.

CELEBRATE: Happy early birthday to Assemblywoman Jacqui Irwin, D-Thousand Oaks, who turns 55 on Jan. 3.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS: This is the final AM Alert from The Bee Capitol Bureau in 2016. Expect the newsletter to appear in your inbox again on January 4.

Taryn Luna: 916-326-5545, @TarynLuna Jim Miller of The Bee Capitol Bureau contributed to this report.

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