Capitol Alert

Tim Draper wants to change the state: ‘This is not Calexit. This is Cal-fix-it.’

Tim Draper speaks during a news conference in 2014 to roll out the signature-gathering campaign for his proposed ballot measure to split California into six states.
Tim Draper speaks during a news conference in 2014 to roll out the signature-gathering campaign for his proposed ballot measure to split California into six states. Bay Area News Group

Tim Draper, the Silicon Valley venture capitalist who carried an unsuccessful initiative to split the state in six pieces, is plotting new proposals to “make California a great government again.”

He’s just not ready to reveal them, yet.

After spending nearly $5.3 million on the Six Californias effort, Draper said he’s been polling, meeting with analysts, interest groups and subject-matter experts, and studying various geographical reconfigurations and policy reforms to create a California 2.0.

“This is not Calexit. This is Cal-fix-it,” Draper told The Sacramento Bee in a phone interview Tuesday.

“We think the state needs a reboot,” he added, bemoaning high costs, low services and aging infrastructure, including the damaged Oroville Dam spillway.

For his next act, Draper said his team is expecting some assistance from “the Brits.” He’s heard from Nigel Farage, the British politician who led the UK Independence Party and masterminded Brexit. While they are talking about Farage’s precise role, Draper said, “the guy has been through something like it.”

Still, he stopped short of saying his unspecified plan would definitely divide the state. He added that a previous report from the United Kingdom noting Farage’s involvement in a California plan incorrectly promoted a state split into two long, narrow east-west sections.

“We like to think of it as ‘inspiring’ the state, or creating new states where there was a state government that was struggling,” Draper said.

Draper remains uncommitted on the separate Calexit proposal that would have the Golden State secede from the United States. A statewide Berkeley IGS Poll found it is opposed by nearly 70 percent of voters.

“I don’t know how I’ll vote for that, but I am not actively supporting it,” he said. “Whether California is a part of the United States or outside the United States, we have got to make our government work in California.”

This video describes a proposal to allow California to split from the United States.

Yes California Independence Campaign on Nov. 9, 2016 discusses a budding movement to make California a standalone nation. Marcus Ruiz Evans, shown here, later quit the group, and on Aug. 17, 2017 pushed a new effort calling for a constitutional co

Christopher Cadelago: 916-326-5538, @ccadelago

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