Capitol Alert

What lawmakers said about their decisions on the gas-tax vote

On March 29, 2017, Gov. Jerry Brown, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, left, and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin DeLeon announce a deal to raise an average of $5.2 billion a year for 10 years to repair California roads.
On March 29, 2017, Gov. Jerry Brown, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, left, and Senate President Pro Tem Kevin DeLeon announce a deal to raise an average of $5.2 billion a year for 10 years to repair California roads. rpench@sacbee.com

Lawmakers issued statements following Thursday evening’s state Senate vote to approve Senate Bill 1. Here is a sampling:

“This state cannot continue to just put asphalt band aids on potholes when what we really need is major road and rail surgery to keep Californians and their economy moving. In addition, this will be transformative for commerce and commuter travel throughout the Central Valley.”

– State Sen. Anthony Cannella, R-Modesto

“Beyond the issues of setting better spending priorities and taxes, I also believed this bill could have been improved. We need to be more forward thinking, where we recognize the role technology can play in allowing us to use our roads and highways more efficiently. And we need a plan that provides commuters with the confidence and assurance that reliable transit will be there for them every day of the year.”

– State Sen. Steve Glazer, D-Orinda

“Today’s vote is a sobering reminder that elections have consequences.”

– State Sen. Patricia Bates, R-Laguna Niguel

“We are deeply disappointed that the Legislature chose to sacrifice our clean air plans just to appease one polluting industry in their haste to rush through a transportation funding bill. The dirty truck amendment is a dangerous and unnecessary giveaway to an industry that has been the largest source of air pollution in the state. Californians deserve far better than this flawed and compromised bill.”

– State Sen. Jim Nielsen, R-Gerber

“SB 1 will punish my constituents and ALL but the wealthiest of Californians - those who can afford to live near where they work and who drive brand new, fuel-efficient vehicles.”

– State Sen. Scott Wilk, R-Santa Clarita

“Asking taxpayers to pay hundreds of dollars a year in more taxes when we’ve not spent one dime more on transportation from the general fund in years makes no sense. We have plenty of money ... we just need to spend it on the right priorities.”

– State Sen. Jeff Stone, R-Temecula

“Jacking up gas taxes and registration fees will harm the working poor, unemployed, and struggling middle class families in the Central Valley and frankly it’s just throwing good money after bad. This is a scam.”

State Sen. Andy Vidak, R-Hanford

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