Capitol Alert

No holiday for voting in California – plus a look at five other bills killed

Voters cast their ballots as a dog named "Mister Mocha" waits patiently for his owner to finish on Nov. 8, 2016, at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Sacramento.
Voters cast their ballots as a dog named "Mister Mocha" waits patiently for his owner to finish on Nov. 8, 2016, at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Sacramento. lsterling@sacbee.com

There will be no state holiday for public employees to vote or tax credit for veterinary expenses.

Dozens of legislative proposals were killed Friday in the semiannual culling of bills with high price tags, known as the “suspense file.” The Assembly Appropriations Committee weighed the fates of 531 measures with a combined fiscal impact estimated at $25.1 billion, ultimately sending 351 to the Assembly floor for a vote next week.

While a lucky few were held in the committee to be reconsidered next year – including Assembly Bill 9, the effort by Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia, D-Bell Gardens, to remove sales taxes for tampons – most of the other 180 measures are done for the session. Among the victims were:

▪  Assembly Bill 155, by Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez, D-Los Angeles, a post-election push to teach students how to identify “fake news.”

▪  Assembly Bill 674, by Assemblyman Evan Low, D-Campbell, to provide state and public school workers a paid day off for November general elections.

▪  Assembly Bill 838, by Assemblyman Marc Levine, D-Greenbrae, which would have mandated a high school government curriculum about the 2016 presidential election, including possible Russian interference.

▪  Assembly Bill 942, by Assemblyman Devon Mathis, R-Visalia, which would have allowed dog and cat owners to claim half their vet costs for the year, up to $2,000, as an income tax credit.

▪  Assembly Bill 1110, by Assemblyman Autumn Burke, D-Marina Del Rey, a controversial requirement for comprehensive eye exams for all students entering elementary school that divided optometrists and ophthalmologists.

▪  Assembly Bill 1234, by Levine, to restrict the size of campaign donations from political parties to individual candidates, which can currently be up to eight times the size of the direction contribution limit.

Alexei Koseff: 916-321-5236, @akoseff

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