Capitol Alert

It’s do-or-die day for California lawmakers

'Sanctuary state' bill prompts clergy to sit-in, sing at Jerry Brown's office

Clergy staged an impromptu sit-in at Gov. Jerry Brown's office to urge him to support California's "sanctuary state" bill without further amendments they said would weaken the measure on Tuesday. Aug. 29, 2017.
Up Next
Clergy staged an impromptu sit-in at Gov. Jerry Brown's office to urge him to support California's "sanctuary state" bill without further amendments they said would weaken the measure on Tuesday. Aug. 29, 2017.

Today is the last day of the legislative session.

By the end of the day, the Legislature will have sent hundreds of bills to Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, including a measure from Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León that would make California a “sanctuary state,” restricting the ability of local law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration agents.

Brown, who called for amendments to the bill, is likely to sign it. His action on hundreds more is less certain, including a drug pricing bill opposed by the pharmaceutical industry, a measure that would ban smoking at California state parks and beaches and a bill that would extend until 2025 the incentive program granting carpool stickers to electric car drivers.

He’s also expected to sign bills aimed at addressing California’s widening housing crisis, assuming they clear both houses. The package includes a controversial bill that would impose a $75 to $225 fee on real estate transactions, one that would put a $4 billion housing bond before voters next year and measures to speed the development of housing.

The bill is part of a larger housing package, which includes measures to streamline the development process, strengthen rules that require cities and counties to build low-income housing and speed housing construction.

Welcome to the AM Alert, your morning rundown on California policy and politics. To receive it regularly, please sign up here.

SANCTUARY STATE: The Legislature is poised to vote today on de León’s Senate Bill 54, amended earlier this week to address concerns that Brown had.

The sanctuary state bill would restrict how much local law enforcement agencies are allowed to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. Changes allow local authorities to hold people convicted of serious or violent felonies, a misdemeanor punishable as a felony, felony drunk driving, unlawful possession of a deadly weapon, felony drug crimes and other lesser crimes.

De León said it still helps ensure local law enforcement agencies aren’t acting as de-facto immigration agents.

INSURANCE PREMIUMS: President Donald Trump and his administration have advanced plans to cut the marketing budget for the Affordable Care Act to $10 billion in 2018, down from $100 billion this year. That cut could reduce spending on advertising and health navigators paid to help people enroll in Obamacare, and dramatically impact the number of people signing up for insurance, according to state officials.

In California, two factors – bigger enrollment numbers and healthier people signing up for insurance – have lowered the cost of premiums 6 to 8 percent in 2015 and 2016, according to a new Covered California report.

But that could change under the Trump administration.

“Lower investments mean less stable markets and higher premiums,” the report found.

CELEBRATE: Happy birthday to Rep. Nanette Barragan, D-Los Angeles, who turns 41 today, and Assemblywoman Blanca Rubio, D-Fremont, who turns 48. Happy birthday also to Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher, D-San Diego, who turns 46 on Saturday. On Sunday, Assemblyman Edwin Chau, D-Arcadia, will celebrate his 60th birthday, Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva, D-Fullerton, turns 55 and Assemblyman Tim Grayson, D-Concord, turns 50.

Related stories from Sacramento Bee

  Comments