Capitol Alert

Jerry Brown pushes California's relationship with China on economy, climate policy

Gov. Jerry Brown addresses the crowd at a victims right rally Monday, April 9, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Brow, who has backed several measures to reduce criminal penalties has warned voters and lawmakers agates reappearing the changes.
Gov. Jerry Brown addresses the crowd at a victims right rally Monday, April 9, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Brow, who has backed several measures to reduce criminal penalties has warned voters and lawmakers agates reappearing the changes. AP

Gov. Jerry Brown delivers the keynote address at a economic forum today in Beverly Hills focused on business between California and China.

The all-day summit features state lawmakers and business officials from China. The broad focus is on economic policy, clean energy, global trade, development of transportation and infrastructure projects in China and artificial intelligence. It's aimed at connecting Chinese business officials with leaders of industry in California.

Brown has participated in the annual event since it started in 2016. His speech will address California's "close environmental and economic ties with China," according to spokesman Evan Westrup.

Sid Voorakkara, deputy director for external affairs with the Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development, will discuss the "rise of the machines and the artificial intelligence revolution," according to organizers.

Lawmakers also listed to speak are Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, D-Winters, and Assemblymen Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, Ed Chau, D-Arcadia, Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, and Chad Mayes, R-Yucca Valley.

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CONSUMER DATA: Proponents of a proposed November ballot initiative that seeks to strengthen consumer privacy rights say they've gathered enough signatures for it to qualify. Backers needed 365,880 valid signatures by June 18. They said they've received 625,000.

The measure would allow consumers to access what personal information companies collect and sell, and give them a way to opt out of allowing it to be sold. It would cost in the "low tens of millions of dollars" annually to implement and enforce it, according to the state.

Opponents in California's tech industry, led by AT&T, Google and Facebook, are gearing up for an expensive fight.

CLIMATE CHANGE: Lawmakers are set to discuss the state's cap-and-trade program at a joint committee hearing beginning at 1 p.m.

The panelists are Edie Chang, deputy executive officer at the California Air Resources Board, Danny Cullenward, an energy economist, and Ross Brown of the state Legislative Analyst's Office. They are expected to address a variety of questions, including how effective the cap-and-trade program has been in reducing emissions, and potential oversupply of pollution allowances in the market.

The hearing is in Room 126 of the Capitol.

SAFE DRINKING WATER: State Sen. Bill Monning, D-Carmel, hosts a legislative briefing today on the lack of safe drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley.

A March study by UC Davis found nearly 100,000 people who live in the San Joaquin Valley don't have access to clean drinking water. The problem in rural, unincorporated communities, from Fresno and Merced County, to Tulare and Kern, is felt mostly by low-income people and communities of color, the report found.

Drinking water is unsafe due largely to contamination from agriculture, oil and gas production, transportation and manufacturing, researchers found. The wastewater treatment and disposal systems in the region are inadequate, the report said.

The briefing is at 1 p.m. in Room 444 of the Capitol.

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