Capitol Alert

California's ballot is set. Here's what's on it

How a new ballot measure would split California three ways

Venture capitalist Tim Draper’s new plan to break up California is on the November 2018 ballot. This time he wants to split the Golden State into three states. Here's what that would look like.
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Venture capitalist Tim Draper’s new plan to break up California is on the November 2018 ballot. This time he wants to split the Golden State into three states. Here's what that would look like.

The ballot for California's Nov. 6 election was set Thursday after state and county officials determined which initiative measures will come before voters.

Let's have a three-way split!

Venture capitalist Tim Draper's dream to divide the Golden State will actually get a vote this year. His measure, if approved, would trigger a fairly arduous political road to "Three Californias." Taryn Luna has what you need to know.

Repeal the gas tax increase

The cornerstone of the campaigns of Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox and other GOP hopefuls in California, this measure would repeal a $5 billion-a-year gasoline tax and fee increase the Democrat-controlled Legislature and Gov. Jerry Brown approved last year to repair California's roads. Here's what the tax will fix and how much it's costing you — if it survives.

Increases to California's gas tax were approved in 2017 and will continue for years.

Don't raise my rent

Renters and housing advocates will battle landlords and developers over a measure that would allow cities and counties to enact much more comprehensive rent control laws. Here's a primer from Angela Hart.

What is Proposition 10? Here's a deeper look at the rent control initiative on California's November ballot that would authorize stronger rent control laws.



Tax cut for baby-boomers

The California Association of Realtors wants to change Proposition 13, California's 40-year-old tax-cutting measure, to give a property tax break to homeowners over 55 buying a new home. Ryan Lillis explains.

Does anybody really know what time it is?

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill that starts the ball rolling for California to change Daylight Saving Time. Voters will decide whether to erase a 1949 initiative that established Standard Pacific Time in California. If it passes, the Legislature can weigh in on what to do — including making Daily Saving Time year round.

Learn why we change clocks twice a year in this brief history of Daylight Saving Time.

Dialysis clinic fee restriction

Health care union SEIU-United Health Care Workers West is trying to organize the private outpatient dialysis clinics, and is backing a measure that would limit how much they could charge patients and require them to report financial information to the state. Both supporters and opponents have strong opinions.

Farm animal living, Part II

The Humane Society of the United States is building on Proposition 2, the 2008 measure that increased the minimum living space for chickens, with an initiative to impose specific rules for cage-free hens, calves and pigs.

Water bonds

Gerald Meral, longtime environmental advocate — and bond measure organizer — has pieced together a $8.9 billion bond that would improve water quality, fix dams (including Oroville) and protect habitat, among other things. Read about Meral and the projects.

Housing bonds

State lawmakers included this $4 billion bond to build more housing as part of a package of measures aimed at easing California's housing affordability crisis. Here's how the money will be used and how the deal came together in the Legislature.

Children's hospital bonds

The measure authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds to build, expand, renovate and equip children's hospitals.

Homeless housing

A last-minute bill approved by lawmakers and Gov. Jerry Brown asks voters to allow counties to use money from Proposition 63's "millionaire's tax" on permanent housing for the homeless that includes a direct connection to social services.

Private ambulance meal breaks

Colorado-based American Medical Response is putting millions behind a measure that would continue longstanding industry practice of companies like them (private emergency ambulance companies) requiring workers to be on call during rest and meal breaks. A 2016 court decision said such practices were illegal under California workplace rules, and the measure also seeks to head off litigation that has been brought. It also would require the companies to give employees specific training and provide mental health services.

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