Capitol Alert

Bills on sick days, Uber drug tests, Prop 47, independent police prosecutor die in Assembly

Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez, D- Los Angeles, who now chairs the Appropriations Commitee, during the first day of session at the State Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012 .
Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez, D- Los Angeles, who now chairs the Appropriations Commitee, during the first day of session at the State Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012 . hamezcua@sacbee.com

In a ritual thinning of the bill herd, the Assembly Appropriations Committee on Thursday halted measures seeking to increase police officer accountability, launch a new University of California campus and bring more workers into California’s mandatory paid sick leave program.

Bills that would cost California at least $150,000 to implement, a list that includes most (but not all) high-profile proposals, first go on the fiscal committee’s suspense file as the chair and party leaders mull which bills they will allow to advance to floor votes. The results of this year’s culling were announced today.

Among the bills blocked were Assembly Bill 11, a measure by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, that would have extended paid sick leave to home health care workers who were left out of last year’s landmark paid sick days bill. Before throwing his support behind last year’s measure, Gov. Jerry Brown drew a line on in-home supportive services workers who had already prevailed in a budget fight related to overtime hours.

Also killed were two Republican measures responding to Proposition 47, which downgraded some drug and theft crimes from felonies to misdemeanors. Assembly Bill 46 would have made possessing date rape drugs with intent to use them a felony, and Assembly Bill 150 would let voters make stealing a gun a felony (Proposition 47 says stolen goods must be worth at least $950 to bring a felony charge).

Here are some of the other items that were shelved:

AB 24 (Nazarian) would have mandated drug testing of Uber and Lyft drivers.

AB 34 (Bonta/Jones-Sawyer) would have regulated medical marijuana in a way preferable to many in the cannabis industry. A separate cannabis regulation bill championed by cities and police chiefs, Assembly Bill 266, did advance with Bonta and Jones-Sawyer added as authors and pieces of AB 34 incorporated into AB 266.

AB 65 (Alejo) would have created a grant program to equip peace officers with body cameras.

AB 86 (McCarty) sought to require special independent prosecutors to handle police shootings.

AB 334 (Cooley) sought to end profiling of motorcycle riders.

AB 619 (Weber) would have created a report on how many people die statewide in police custody.

AB 1240 (Bonta) would have compelled schools with many low-income students to provide breakfast.

AB 1410 (Nazarian) sought to prohibit CalPERS from investing in Turkish vehicles.

AB 1483 (Gatto) would have started laying the groundwork for a new tech-centric University of California campus.

Jeremy B. White: (916) 326-5543, @CapitolAlert

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