Capitol Alert

California governments collected $412 billion in 2012

Phil Rothrock, a tax preparation assistant at the State Franchise Tax Board, receives incoming tax returns through a mail sorter on February 16, 2006. Personal income taxes accounted for $55 billion of the nearly $412 billion in state and local revenues in 2012. Sacramento Be/ Lezlie Sterling
Phil Rothrock, a tax preparation assistant at the State Franchise Tax Board, receives incoming tax returns through a mail sorter on February 16, 2006. Personal income taxes accounted for $55 billion of the nearly $412 billion in state and local revenues in 2012. Sacramento Be/ Lezlie Sterling Sacramento Bee Staff Photo

California’s state and local governments collected nearly $412 billion in taxes, fees, interest, federal grants and other payments in 2012 and spent nearly $449 billion, according to a new Census Bureau report.

The state and local revenues were the equivalent of about 20 percent of the state’s overall economy and represented 13.2 percent of all state and local government collections in the nation that year – roughly the same as California’s proportion of the national population.

The state collected $251 billion during 2012 from all sources and local governments received $252 billion, but $88 billion of the latter came from the state, mostly to support schools and county-managed health and welfare programs. Overall, too, $65.3 billion of the state and local income came from the federal government.

$65.3 billion The amount of state and local income that came from the federal government.

Taxes of all kinds accounted for $183.7 billion of the revenue streams for state and local governments, topped by $55 billion in personal income taxes.

Much of the revenue came from fees and other charges, such as the $8.3 billion collected by public colleges and universities, mostly in student fees, and $17.5 billion in revenues of state and local hospitals.

Expenditures in the Census Bureau report totaled $448.7 billion, including $107 billion for K-12 and higher education, $60.4 billion on welfare services, $16.9 billion on transportation, and $35.3 billion on police and fire protection and state and local incarceration.

While spending topped revenues by some $37 billion, expenditures also included borrowed bond money and other funds not connected to current revenues.

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