Capitol Alert

AM Alert: Curtain falls on 2015 California bill signings

California Gov. Jerry Brown, sitting center, surrounded by government officials, signs SB 350 at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015.
California Gov. Jerry Brown, sitting center, surrounded by government officials, signs SB 350 at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. AP

With some final flourishes of the gubernatorial pen, the 2015 legislative session has truly come to a close.

Technically session ended back in September, but since then lawmakers and interest groups have been busy lobbying Gov. Jerry Brown to sign or veto some of the stack of bills on his desk. Sunday was the final day for the governor to do so. Before we all go into hibernation, a review of Brown’s record:

Bills Signed: Setting steeper goals to deal with climate change; allowing dying Californians to obtain lethal drugs; establishing automatic voter registration at the DMV; barring concealed weapons on campus; regulating California’s medical cannabis industry; requiring warrants for digital searches; banning cosmetic microbeads, Redskins mascots and the sale of ivory products; granting legislative input on the Air Resources Board; bolstering equal pay requirements; parsing racial profiling by police; nixing an exit exam graduation requirement; making “crisis pregnancy centers” tell customers about reproductive healthcare.

Bills Vetoed: Barring drone flight over private property and a trio of bills further seeking to control drone use; banning the use of bullhooks on elephants; halting the naming of public buildings after Confederate States of America figures; creating a new date-rape felony, part of a suite of crime bills nixed for complicating the criminal code; opening a carpool lane in Los Angeles; requiring public meetings before local cops acquire military surplus equipment; tightening rules around the scandal-scarred Public Utilities Commission; extending access to experimental drugs for the terminally ill; expanding family leave.

See all of Brown’s actions on keys bills at our gallery.

TRACK THE LEGISLATURE: What's influencing lawmakers' actions? A data feature in our legislative directory lets you see which interests are the biggest givers to every legislator. You'll also find key census information about every legislative district, including unemployment and poverty rates.

CARLY CASH: We’ve already noted a certain Democratic bigwig doing some pre-election fundraising in California – today a Republican contender with a claim to a California homebase will also be shaking the campaign cash tree. Consensus debate high achiever Carly Fiorina will be in Piedmont trying to propel a bid that now has her within the margin of error for first in California.

SO MONEY: On the topic of the money game, former top California money watchdog Ann Ravel – now a member of the Federal Election Commission – will be talking about the current state and the future of campaign finance rules with Democratic strategist Ace Smith and Republican operative Ben Ginsberg at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco this evening.

PRESIDENT BROWN? Not likely, but check out today’s Field Poll story by David Siders that explores the question.

Jeremy B. White: 916-326-5543, @CapitolAlert

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