Capitol Alert

AM Alert: California examines its post-Paris climate agenda

Gov. Jerry Brown, center, flanked by Baden-Wurttemberg Minister-President Winfried Kretschmann, left, of Germany, and Baja California Gov. Francisco A. Vega de Lamadrid, sign a non-binding climate change agreement in Sacramento on May 19, 2015.
Gov. Jerry Brown, center, flanked by Baden-Wurttemberg Minister-President Winfried Kretschmann, left, of Germany, and Baja California Gov. Francisco A. Vega de Lamadrid, sign a non-binding climate change agreement in Sacramento on May 19, 2015. AP

For a conference aimed at world leaders who were seeking to forge a climate deal, the Paris climate conference sure attracted a lot of state politicians.

Gov. Jerry Brown talked up the conference constantly, rolling out agreements with sub-national governments and using the platform to cement his final-term commitment to climate change. He was joined by a contingent of lawmakers that included Democratic leadership from both houses. Once they returned to California, said Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, the “real work” would commence.

That work, and how it ties into the global accord, will be the focus of a joint hearing this morning looking at California’s cap-and-trade program and an official investment plan on how to spend the proceeds from selling carbon permits. We could also see some discussion of Brown’s emissions-slashing executive order (a bill putting the goal in law crumbled last year). Speakers are expected to include California Environmental Protection Agency Secretary Matt Rodriquez and California Air Resources Board chair Mary Nichols. Starting at 9:30 a.m. in Room 112.

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YOU TALKIN’ TO PUC? The California Public Utilities Commission gets little love these days, with critics citing a methane leak in Aliso Canyon as the latest sign the regulator is falling down on the job. Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Glendale, is unveiling this morning what he’s billing as a major PUC reform bill. From 10:30 am to 11:00 am in room 317.

SCHOOLED: Worried about low community college graduation rates, lawmakers have pushed the California Community Colleges to do better by implementing a “student success” task force and allocating hundreds of millions of dollars to the effort. Today a Senate Education Committee hearing will examine how they’re doing, drawing on a range of school officials led by Chancellor Brice W. Harris. Starting at 9 a.m. in room 4203.

MEET THE PRESS: We’re dedicated to covering interest groups and lobbying here at The Bee, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have our own Capitol representation. Today is the California Newspaper Publishers Association’s government affairs day (The Bee is a member), which will include morning remarks at the convention center by de León and Assembly Republican Leader Chad Mayes, R-Yucca Valley, and a panel moderated by Bee Executive Editor Joyce Terhaar.

JUST? One of the early budget flashpoints has been the fate of Proposition 47 savings, with criminal justice reform advocates arguing not enough is flowing to rehabilitation. Watch for that topic to come up at a Select Committee on the Status of Boys and Men of Color hearing today on “justice reform and reinvestment in California,” along with sentencing reform and use of force by law enforcement. Witnesses are expected to include representatives of community groups and Lenore Anderson, executive director of the Proposition 47 champion Californians for Safety and Justice. From 1 to 3 p.m. in Room 126.

Jeremy B. White: 916-326-5543, @CapitolAlert

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