Capitol Alert

California Senate kills bill requiring doctors to tell of probation

Senator Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo during session in the Senate chambers in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday, March 11, 2013.
Senator Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo during session in the Senate chambers in Sacramento, Calif. on Monday, March 11, 2013. hamezcua@sacbee.com

A bill requiring doctors on probation to tell patients about their status failed in the Senate this week.

Senate Bill 1033, introduced by Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, lost on the Senate floor Wednesday with 15 votes in favor, six votes short of passing. Thirteen voted against, and a dozen members opted to not weigh in at all.

Sen. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, spoke out against the bill, questioning language suggesting doctors would need to disclose allegations against them before a final decision is rendered on their case. Pan, a physician, voted against the bill.

The California Medical Association and several other groups representing physicians, plastic surgeons and psychiatrists also opposed the measure. Consumers Union, California Public Interest Research Group, Californians for Patients Rights, the Center for Public Interest Law and other pro-consumer groups supported the bill.

“We’re extremely disappointed that state lawmakers have put the interests of doctors with a history of serious misconduct above the public’s right to know,” Lisa McGiffert of Consumers Union, a division of Consumer Reports, said in a statement. “Californians deserve to know when their doctor has been put on probation for serious and dangerous misconduct.”

The Senate moved to reconsider the bill on Thursday, but did not bring it up for a vote. The Senate does not intend to convene again this week, which means the bill will miss Friday’s deadline for legislation to pass out of its house of origin.

Taryn Luna: 916-326-5545, @TarynLuna

  Comments