Capitol Alert

AM Alert: The suspense (file) is killing us

Assemblyman Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, holds his 21-month-old granddaughter Kimberly Blomquist after he was sworn into the Assembly. Chu’s bill to abolish Daylight Savings Time is one of many bills to watch on the Assembly and Senate suspense files on Thursday.
Assemblyman Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, holds his 21-month-old granddaughter Kimberly Blomquist after he was sworn into the Assembly. Chu’s bill to abolish Daylight Savings Time is one of many bills to watch on the Assembly and Senate suspense files on Thursday. hamezcua@sacbee.com

Today is a big day for the Legislature. Both the Assembly and Senate Appropriations committees will meet and decide which bills escape their respective suspense files to be debated on the floor before the session concludes at the end of the month.

Here are the bills to watch in the Senate:

▪ Assembly Bill 385, from Assemblyman Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, to abolish Daylight Saving Time in California.

▪ Assembly Bill 717 , from Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D- San Diego, to exempt diapers from state sales taxes.

▪ Assembly Bill 1561, from Assemblywomen Cristina Garcia, D-Bell Gardens, and Ling Ling Chang, R-Diamond Bar, to repeal the sales tax on feminine hygiene products.

▪ Assembly Bill 1066, also from Gonzalez, would give overtime pay to farm workers in California. An earlier bill with the same purpose was defeated in June, but Gonzalez has said she is hopeful that she can win over a few more Democrats this time around.

▪ Assembly Bill 700, from Assemblymen Marc Levine, D-San Rafael and Jimmy Gomez, D-Los Angeles, also known as the California DISCLOSE Act, would change the rules for disclosure in campaign ads.

▪ Assembly Bill 2888 from Assemblyman Evan Low, D-Campbell, and Bill Dodd, D-Napa, would impose mandatory prison sentences on those convicted of sexually assaulting an unconscious person.

Here are the bills to watch in the Assembly:

▪ Senate Bill 32, from Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, would extend the state’s emissions targets beyond the year 2020 and could open the door for extending cap-and-trade.

▪ Senate Bill 879, an urgency bill from Sen. Jim Beall, D-San Jose, would place a $3 billion affordable housing bond on the Nov. 8 ballot.

▪ Senate Bill 1143, from Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, would restrict the use of room confinement for juvenile inmates. Leno has been pushing the bill for years and is termed out at the end of the year.

▪ Senate Bill 1234 from Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, would create a statewide retirement savings plan for private employees.

▪ Senate Bill 1465, also from de León, would authorize Gov. Jerry Brown to sign agreements in order for Los Angeles to host the 2024 Olympics and Paralympics.

▪ Senate Bill 1010, by Sen. Ed Hernandez, D-West Covina, would require drug makers to justify price increases.

SHOW ME THE MONEY: We are now less than 90 days from the Nov. 8 election which means contributions and independent expenditures must be reported within 24 hours. You can follow the money with our online data tool: The Money Trail.

WORTH REPEATING: “I cannot believe why you’re even debating this bill. People died.”-Aoife Beary, testifying on SB 465 to provide greater scrutiny of building contractors. Beary survived last year’s balcony collapse in Berkeley that killed six

POWER PLAYERS: The 4th Annual Pathway to 2050 conference hosted by Advanced Energy Economy will take place is today in the Sacramento Convention Center. The conference aims to bring policymakers and business leaders together to discuss California’s energy future. Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León is scheduled to speak along with Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, and Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Los Angeles. The Bee’s editorial page editor, Dan Morain, is also scheduled to speak. The conference begins at 9 a.m.

VIDEO: Survivor of Berkeley balcony collapse Aoife Beary testifies on SB 465

CORRECTION: Yesterday’s AM Alert referred to “an effort to repeal race-based college admissions” back in 2014. That sentence should have read “an effort to repeal a ban on race-based college admissions,” since Senate Constitutional Amendment 5 would have overturned a prohibition on affirmative action.

Anshu Siripurapu: 916-321-1060, @AnshuSiripurapu

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