Elections

Donald Trump has won the presidency: ‘It is time for us to come together’

Associated Press and staff reports

Trump vows to be a president for all Americans

Donald Trump delivers his victory speech from his election night event at the New York Hilton in Midtown Manhattan. It was a long-fought presidential election after declaring his candidacy June 16, 2015, and later telling supporters that he would
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Donald Trump delivers his victory speech from his election night event at the New York Hilton in Midtown Manhattan. It was a long-fought presidential election after declaring his candidacy June 16, 2015, and later telling supporters that he would

Donald Trump has been elected the 45th president of the United States, and in a speech to supporters he said Hillary Clinton had called him to concede.

Trump also struck a note of reconciliation. “Now it is time for Americans to bind the wounds of division. It is time for us to come together as one united people,” he said. “I pledge to every citizen that I will be president for all Americans, and this is so important to me.”

His triumph over Clinton will end eight years of Democratic dominance of the White House and threatens to undo major achievements of President Barack Obama. He's pledged to act quickly to repeal Obama's landmark health care law, revoke the nuclear agreement with Iran and rewrite important trade deals with other countries, particularly Mexico and Canada.

The Republican blasted through Democrats' longstanding firewall, carrying Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, states that hadn't voted for a GOP presidential candidate since the 1980s. He needed to win nearly all of the competitive battleground states, and he did just that, claiming Florida, Ohio, North Carolina and others.

Global stock markets and U.S. stock futures plunged deeply, reflecting investor alarm over what a Trump presidency might mean for the economy and trade.

A New York real estate developer who lives in a sparking Manhattan high-rise, Trump forged a striking connection with white, working class Americans who feel left behind in a changing economy and diversifying country. He cast immigration, both from Latin America and the Middle East, as the root of the problems plaguing many Americans and taped into fears of terrorism emanating at home and abroad.

Trump will take office with Congress expected to be fully under Republican control. GOP Senate candidates fended off Democratic challengers in key states and appeared poised to maintain the majority. Republicans also maintained their grip on the House.

Senate control means Trump will have great leeway in appointing Supreme Court justices, which could mean a major change to the right that would last for decades.

Trump will inherit an anxious nation, deeply divided by economic and educational opportunities, race and culture.

Exit polls underscored the fractures: Women nationwide supported Clinton by a double-digit margin, while men were significantly more likely to back Trump. More than half of white voters backed the Republican, while nearly 9 in 10 blacks and two-thirds of Hispanics voted for the Democrat.

The Republican Party's tortured relationship with its nominee was evident right up to the end. Former President George W. Bush and wife Laura Bush declined to back Trump, instead selecting "none of the above" when they voted for president, according to spokesman Freddy Ford.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, a reluctant Trump supporter, called the businessman earlier in the evening to congratulate him, according to a Ryan spokeswoman.

The contest in Florida, the night’s biggest swing state prize, was especially close, but the Associated Press called it for Trump just before 11 p.m.

In south Florida, two precinct workers were fired for failing to stand in the proper places.

In North Carolina, Clinton’s campaign was banking on a surge in major urban areas where the vote count trickled in late. But those votes did not materialize as the Associated Press called the state for Trump just after 11:15 p.m. Polls began closing in most of North Carolina at 7:30, but remained open until 9 p.m. in 8 precincts in one county due to a computer glitch.

And in Nevada, a judge dismissed the Trump campaign’s request in an early voting suit. In California, a fatal shooting temporarily locked down two polling places.

Results appear below.

 
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