National Politics

Another victim of the shutdown: Companies can’t check if job-seekers are citizens

Hear from Yosemite visitors during the government shutdown

The government shutdown hasn't stopped people from visiting the country's national parks. Here's what a few visitors had to say at Yosemite on Jan. 2, 2019.
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The government shutdown hasn't stopped people from visiting the country's national parks. Here's what a few visitors had to say at Yosemite on Jan. 2, 2019.

Here’s one more casualty of the partial government shutdown: E-Verify.

The website for the government-created program said due to “a lapse in federal funding” the service will not be available. Thousands of employers rely on E-verify services, which confirms people’s right to work in the country.

The federal shutdown, which began Dec. 22, is slowly halting various functions of government. National parks are untended and uncleaned. Programs for survivors of domestic abuse have stopped. And many government workers are not being paid.

The shutdown was set off after President Donald Trump couldn’t come to an agreement with Congress about funding a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Created in 1996 as a part of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, the web-based service E-verify counts several organizations in California among its users. Federal law requires employers to ensure their new hires are eligible to work in the United States.

According to its website, the California National Guard, Kaiser Permanente, AT&T and numerous staffing and employment agencies use the program. More than 820,000 organization have agreements for the software, federal data show.

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