California

A TV show is leaving Georgia for California — thanks to tax credits

Executive Producer Jenna Bans, and cast members Christina Hendricks, Retta and Mae Whitman participate in the "Good Girls" panel during the NBC/Universal Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. "Good Girls" is moving from Georgia to California to shoot their second season, thanks to tax credits.
Executive Producer Jenna Bans, and cast members Christina Hendricks, Retta and Mae Whitman participate in the "Good Girls" panel during the NBC/Universal Television Critics Association Winter Press Tour on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif. "Good Girls" is moving from Georgia to California to shoot their second season, thanks to tax credits. Invision/AP

Two television series have become the most recent to relocate to California due to the state’s tax incentives — and one of them is the first TV series to leave Georgia, according to Variety.

"Good Girls," an NBC series that filmed its first season in Atlanta, will relocate to the Golden State for its second season, according to the Los Angeles Business Journal.

The show, set in Michigan, will receive about $9.3 million in tax incentives, The Wrap reported.

New York-based "You," a Lifetime series, will receive $6.1 million in tax credits for their move, according to The Wrap.

In 2014, California's film and television tax credit program was expanded in order to compete with places like Georgia and New York, Variety reported. Since the beginning of 2018, 15 series have relocated to California because of the incentives, according to the publication.

Some of the shows making the move include "Veep" and "Legion," as well as the upcoming seasons of "American Horror Story" and "American Crime Story," according to The Wrap.

On June 27, Gov. Jerry Brown extended the program to 2025, and maintained $330 million in the California budget for annual tax credits, according to the Los Angeles Times.

"We're bringing long-term, high-quality jobs in-state as we reaffirm our commitment to fighting runaway production," California Film Commission Executive Director Amy Lemisch said in a statement, according to the Los Angeles Business Journal.

A 2016 Film L. A. study found that tax credits were the number-one reason productions moved to Georgia, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Productions filmed in the Peach State include Marvel movies like "Captain America: Civil War," and television shows like "The Walking Dead."

However, in July 2017 "Captain Marvel" became the first Marvel movie to leave Georgia and shoot primarily in California since 2014, according to the Los Angeles Times. The movie received upwards of $20 million in tax credits.

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